Mike Barnes, a home builder and real estate developer who lives in the Basin, was appointed to the Snyderville Basin Planning Commission at the Dec. 12 Summit County Council meeting.

"I feel privileged," Barnes said. "It's a nice opportunity to serve after living her for almost 40 years."

Councilmember Claudia McMullin remarked during his Dec. 5 interview that it has been years since a developer has applied for the Planning Commission.

"I definitely think it's a perspective that's always been lacking on the commission. So I'm glad you came," she said.

Barnes has been a Park City resident for 38 years and has been in the real estate business since then.

"I've watched it go from a two-lane road in to what it is today," he said. "I have a love for the business and for this town."

Barnes was involved in the initial development stages of Newpark, but said he doesn't believe his work there or anywhere else will create a conflict of interest.

"If there was something that was a conflict, I would disclose any involvement I've had and let the board decide," he explained.

Councilmember Chris Robinson questioned how Barnes could shift gears and view county development and planning from a community perspective after spending so many years viewing it from the developer's side.

Barnes responded that he knows how the code works and how to evaluate things when people come in. "If there is a clear understanding of the code, and what you can and can't do, you will do a parcel of property with the proper perspective.


Advertisement

"

Barnes added that he has the depth of experience from watching the codes change, development change and the matrix of the town change.

"I intimately know from building a lot of communities what does and doesn't work," he said.

Barnes said he also prides himself on getting along with everybody, and is able to put the Snyderville Basin Development Code first while making decisions fair and not antagonistic.

"I was very privileged in that as my partners and I went about work, if we made a mistake we made less money than if we did it right, so it was a very forgiving learning curve," Barnes said. "I love Park City. And I'm here to stay."