Anthony Magliano's original idea for the multi-media performance company Quixotic Fusion was to pair artists of different disciplines to see what they could create.

"We wanted to put together a graphic designer and performers and musicians and explore that fusion of them coming together," said Mica Thomas, the company's associate artistic director. "We wanted them to develop a strong collaboration between them."

Thomas and Magliano's initial goal was to have the artists create little vignettes that would be presented in old abandoned buildings and warehouses in Kansas City, Mo.

"As the group started to progress, we developed a through-line that would connect the different pieces together that utilized a core group of artists, and we created a whole show," Thomas said.

Seven years after those early warehouse performances, Quixotic Fusion has performed for public and private audiences throughout the United States.

On Saturday, Dec. 22, the company will perform at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., at 7:30 p.m.

Megan Stockman, dancer, aerialist and choreographer, said Quixotic Fusion is looking forward to coming to Park City and hopes the audience will enjoy the show.

"We're going to be performing a few of our repertory pieces," Stockman said.

One work is a blend of live and digital media, which was conceived by a dancer and a projectionist.

"The audience will see the dancer behind a scrim dancing with projections," Stockman explained. "We'll also have a few pieces that showcase more dancers interacting with our percussionists. The performances are like conversations between the artists."

The troupe's centerpiece work Quixotic Fusion is an aerial creation that utilizes a hammock-like apparatus.

"It's kind of like what our aerialists do with silks, but in addition to twisting and wrapping themselves up in the material, they will be able to sit or recline in different positions in the hammock."

The apparatus flips horizontally and vertically.

"It's beautiful and geometric and looks like a piece of art in and of itself," Stockman said. "It can also spin and the dancers can stand up inside it."

When Stockman says "dancers," she means the work is a duet.

"It's about a girl's journey through the forest and an expression of the different challenges she faces," Stockman explained. "It starts off in a cocoon shape and then expands and develops. The difficult thing is that there is not a lot of fabric to grip onto."

Stockman, who has been with Quixotic Fusion for 3 ½ years, said the enjoyment of creating repertory for the company lies in the collaborations.

"It is an adjustment taking a story that you have for your piece and adapting and altering it to fit within the context of the evening's performance," she said. "Plus, you're also creating it with different people, so you have to be open to turning the piece into something new.

"So, you have this idea and then others will enhance it, which challenges you as well," she said. "Sometimes challenging oneself is hard as an artist, but when you have other artists giving input, it opens up a new world."

Stockman also likes the physicality of the company's style.

"Athleticism is a large part of what we do," she said. "Our dancers don't just dance, but do all the other things like being an aerialist as well.

"Usually with other companies, an aerialist will perform one piece, but with us, the aerialists can perform up to three pieces as well as dance in one performance. So, it's like an extreme workout.

"The productions we do are multi-media and it's unique in this day and age to utilize that with live performances," Stockman said. "A lot of performance companies have strictly gone the electronic route and have taken the live music out of the show, but we haven't."

Stockman joined Quixotic Fusion a few years after seeing a performance while she was attending the University of Missouri Kansas City.

"I saw the show and fell in love with it," she said. "It inspired me, and I knew that was the company I wanted to perform with.

"The thing that I loved is that the artists have a strong technique and movement with the skills of the acrobats and the live musicians," she said. "I really appreciated the mixture of disciplines that wasn't exclusive."

Stockman's dance background led her to the performance.

"I have been dancing since I was really young, and when I got into contemporary ballet, looked for a company that offered a unique flair and it was really hard to fly," she said. "That's when I discovered Quixotic Fusion, and it was amazing to me that they were based in my city."

When the company comes to Park City, the artists will teach two dance classes to area high school students.

"What's cool about our group is that we have mixture of the new and classic methods of all these art forms, including performance and digital media," Stockman said. "It's important for us to share that with young people and show the possibilities of art and technology. They are the future and it will be interesting to see what they come up with in their artistic endeavors."

Quixotic Fusion will perform at the Eccles Center on Saturday, Dec. 22, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets range from $20 to $67 and available by visiting ecclescenter.org/upcoming-events/quixotic-fusion-saturday-december-22-2012/ . For more information, visit www.quixoticfusion.com .