A man who was accused of making a death threat at a pharmacy in Park City in September to obtain medicine used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has been put on probation but was not ordered to serve prison time.

Judge Todd Shaughnessy on Monday sentenced Caleb Amberson to up to five years in state prison with the time suspended. Shaughnessy also handed down two suspended 365-day jail sentences.

Amberson, 26 years old and now living in Salt Lake City, earlier pleaded guilty to a charge of obstruction of justice and no contest to charges of attempted robbery and possession or use of a controlled substance. The attempted robbery count, a third-degree felony, was the most serious.

Shaughnessy put Amberson on probation for three years and ordered him to pay a $1,000 fine, with treatment costs being credited toward the fine. The judge suspended another $9,000 in fines.

Some of the requirements of the probation include:

  • not using or possessing alcohol or illegal drugs

  • not associating with people using or possessing alcohol or illegal drugs

  • not going to places where drugs are being used, sold or being distributed illegally

  • not going to places where the chief item that is for sale is alcohol

  • undergoing a mental health evaluation and completing treatment that is recommended

  • taking medicines as they are prescribed

  • using one doctor to obtain prescriptions

    Michaela Andruzzi, the attorney who represented Amberson, said it was best that he not be put in prison as part of the sentence. She said he has support from family and friends. She anticipates he is "going to do just fine."

    "I don't think incarceration is going to serve the goal of rehabilitating my client," Andruzzi said.

    Amberson was sentenced more than four months after his Sept. 19 capture hours after he was at the pharmacy. Prosecutors said Park City police officers were summoned to a pharmacy on Round Valley Drive to investigate a robbery.

    A pharmacy employee told the police a man called earlier in the day asking how much 60 tablets of Adderall would cost. The employee said two hours later a man arrived asking for the medication, prosecutors said. The man was told he needed a prescription, he said he would get the prescription from his car and then returned, the charging document said.

    The man gave the pharmacy worker a handwritten note that demanded the tablets and included a death threat if the medicine was not provided, the prosecutors said. The worker gave the man 60 pills in a pharmacy bottle and then the person left with the pills and the note, according to the charging document.

    The Park City Police Department said afterward investigators developed a source who knew the person, set up a meeting with Amberson in Salt Lake City and arrested him at an undisclosed business at a little after 8 p.m.

    Prosecutors said in the charging document Amberson told investigators he called pharmacies to learn which ones stocked Adderall and then went to pharmacy on Round Valley Drive. He told the investigators he took the pills to Salt Lake City and put them in the trash, the prosecutors said. He also threw away the clothes he was wearing when he went to the pharmacy and his cell phone, the charging document said. He also threw away a half-eaten copy of the note he used to demand the tablets and shaved his goatee, the prosecutors said.