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Movement educator Sharon Starika will hold a special workshop for women called "Listening to Your Inner Voice" at the PC MARC on Wednesday, March 13. The session is designed to help women get in touch with their intuition. (Photo by Sarah Lyman/Panic Button Media)

Most everyone has heard the term "women's intuition." Many children would swear to its legitimacy because their mothers have caught them numerous times doing something they shouldn't.

Sharon Starika, movement educator at the Park City Municipal Athletic & Recreation Center (MARC), believes in that inner voice and wants to help other women get in touch with it.

To do so, she is hosting a "Listening to Your Inner Voice" dinner and workshop for women at the recreation center on Wednesday, March 13, at 6 p.m.

The evening will feature a group exercise that will create the opportunity for the participants to experience that gut feeling within themselves, Starika said.

"Everyone has had that situation when you get a hunch when you feel something is right or something is wrong," she told The Park Record. "There are times when you go buy a car and you just feel it's the right thing to do and things fall into place. Other times, you feel something is not right and you avoid something."

The exercise, which will be done while sitting in chairs, will elaborate on that feeling.

"This way they can be aware of what the feeling means," Starika said. "At the same time, the exercise will allow the women to tap into that feeling when they need it throughout their lives."

Starika chose the topic because she has found women, herself included, tend to put everyone's needs in front of their own.


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"It's kind of in our DNA for women to put ourselves last, and that can result in frustration and disappointment within our inner selves, to the point that we can feel that we are not getting out needs met," she said.

She also believes that some women have felt the gut feeling before, but may not recognize it.

"Some women may feel this all the time, while others may have felt it only a few times," Starika said. "There are some women who struggle to feel it because it's dormant, and that is because they lose themselves in caretaking and put the needs of husbands, boyfriends, children and everyone else before their own. When that happens, some women begin to feel empty. It's a hollow feeling when you continue to give and there is nothing left for yourself."

Starika said she became aware of that emptiness after her divorce.

"I realized that in order for me to be a great, efficient single mom, I needed to start taking care of myself first," she said. "When I started doing that, things got much better."

Not only did things get better for Starika, but also for her family.

"Children tend to mimic what their mothers do," she explained. "If they see their mom sad and depressed, they will be more inclined to take on those attributes. But if a mom takes care of herself and shows that to her children, she is setting them up to have a better life."

The session is designed to accommodate 24 participants, and there are 12 seats left.

"The room is only so big, so we can't take any overflow," Starika said. "We will sit in chairs and go through the exercise and conduct a brief discussion before eating, and there will not be any tables."

Whole Foods, which is sponsoring the event, will provide the food.

"Whole Foods has been very generous," Starika said. "The meal will be a healthy-options dinner to help complement the setting of taking care of oneself."

Taking care of oneself is an important issue for Starika, who is also the Feldenkrais practitioner at the recreation center.

The Feldenkrais method utilizes a series of movements designed to re-teach people how to move their bodies differently, she said.

"This is helpful with people who have experienced accident injuries or trauma or were born with cerebral palsy," Starika said. "It is all about doing slow and gentle movements so that these movements register through the brain. That way, you create awareness about how you are doing the movement. Through that process and experience, the body shifts to the new way of movement from the old habits that have formed."

Starika, who is a competitive runner and triathlete with more than 20 years in the racing community, got involved with the Feldenkrais method after she was injured in a cycling accident.

"A semi-truck hit me and dragged me under the carriage, and I was told that I would never run again," she said. "My family discovered the Feldenkrais method. I began working with a practitioner and within five weeks, I began to run again."

The "Listening to Your Inner Voice" session is similar to the Feldenkrais method insomuch that the participants will learn how to utilize and tap into the intuitive feeling that they may not have a lot of practice reaching.

"We will help the women so they can readily rely on that feeling when the need arises," Starika said.

Movement educator Sharon Starika will host a dinner workshop called "Listening to Your Inner Voice" for women at Park City Municipal Athletic & Recreation Center, 1200 Little Kate Rd., on Wednesday, March 13, at 6 p.m. Registration is being taken at recreation center's front desk. The cost is $20. For more information, visit www.parkcityrecreation.org.