Editor:

I've worked in solid waste management off and on during my career as a civil engineer. It occurs to me that banning plastic bags isn't a practical solution to the problem of airborne plastic bag litter. I believe empty bags are the major culprit, especially in communities that don't actively recycle plastic bags.

There is a much simpler first step to reduce the problem. Start a "Tie the Knot" public education program in the community, especially in the elementary schools. Plastic bags don't sail away with an overhand or square knot tied at their midriff. I believe there would be a significant decrease in the problem if consumers took this one simple step. Keep it simple, right?

Craig G. Neeley

Bountiful, Utah


Is rainbow flag theft a sign of intolerance?

Editor:

This is an open letter to the Kamas High School kids who keep stealing our rainbow flag, and to the parents of those kids.

We have five children in our blended family, three of whom are gay. We are so proud of all five of them! All five are productive, taxpaying citizens of the U.S. The three who are gay, however, continue to be treated in many ways like second-class citizens in our country. This is very disheartening to us as parents. Our choice to fly a rainbow flag is an effort to support those three kids (all adults now) and perhaps inspire conversation and education among those who see it. Our hope is simply that, one day, all five of our kids will be treated fairly and equally.

The Constitution of The United States ensures us freedom of religion as well as freedom of expression. It is not your right to take that freedom from us any more that it would be okay for us to go to your home (or church) and take anything we wanted that was dissimilar to our own beliefs.

We are not sure why you continue to steal our rainbow flag. We can only guess that either:

A. You are gay and are decorating your room in a rainbow flag motif. If so, just knock on the door, and we'll give you all the flags you need!

OR:

B. You are ignorant and intolerant. If so, it may be a good time to educate yourselves. Sadly, religion is often the justification for such ignorance. Read the New Testament. Jesus made no exceptions when he said we should love all people. Also, equality is coming, like it or not. Deal.

Parents of Kamas: If you have a high school student, please do us a favor and talk to your kids. We respect your right to teach them anything you wish. However, if you are saying to them something like, "We don't believe in (gay marriage, Easter Bunnies, whatever), make sure you add, "But we never judge those who believe differently." If you don't add this phrase, you are unwittingly teaching intolerance and, yes, even hate. Talk to them. Make sure your student is not involved in this ridiculous display of disrespect.

Currently we have you kids on several different charges; theft, vandalism, and trespassing, for starters. You may want to stop while you're ahead. Our guess is that we have more money (to buy flags) than you have youthful ignorance. Time will tell.

Gay Lynn and Craig Costa

Kamas


Christian Center's wonderful service

Editor:

I would like to acknowledge the wonderful service the Park City Christian Center provides to our community. On many occasions I have observed the compassionate, hardworking employees reaching out to those in need.

We are truly blessed by their presence in our town.

Thank you!

Kathy Chilson

Park City


Boulder, Colorado, may not be a good model

Editor:

As a dog owner here in Park City, I welcome suggestions about how to resolve the ongoing on-leash/off-leash controversy. However, Lorraine Johnson in her letter to the editor in the Wednesday, May 10, edition of The Park Record got one key fact incorrect. You can't actually own a dog in Boulder, Colorado. No kidding.

Several years ago, the Boulder City Council spent approximately nine long months and oodles of taxpayer money to determine that those folks who reside with dogs should be known as "dog guardians" not dog owners. It's true check it out: http://www.bouldercolorado.gov/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=13825&Itemid=4675 .

If my memory serves me, that was the main accomplishment of the city council that year. Therefore, off-leash laws aside, I recommend we tread lightly when following the lead of the Boulder City Council with respect to setting policy and priorities.

Kathryn Zwack

Park Meadows