Mayor-elect Thomas says thanks

Friends and Neighbors:

Thank you for electing me to be your next Mayor! I eagerly anticipate this opportunity to serve Park City, and I recognize that many people have contributed time, financial support, wisdom and advice to this great effort. Thanks from the bottom of my heart to those who enthusiastically knocked on doors with me, hosted campaign events at homes and businesses, displayed yard signs, walked in the parade, and -- so importantly -- voted.

The outcome of this election demonstrates that the community values we all share remain a top priority, and I look forward to preserving them while serving Park City.

Andy Beerman and his supporters mounted a great campaign. Their efforts made the political process work as it should, requiring both sides to articulate their ideas and engage the voters. Our community is better informed for the experience. So thanks, too, to Andy and his friends for a great race. Now it's time to come together and work for our community.

I'm truly humbled by your support and the overwhelming amount of kind words and good wishes I've received since the election. I have some vacation plans, and then work to do to finish my commitment to Planning Commission and to prepare for this next, exciting job. I look forward to serving this small town I love so dearly.

Jack Thomas

Park City

Pellet shooter needs therapy

Editor:

I have been a resident of Park City for 20 years.


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I live in Jeremy Ranch on Upper Lando Lane and Sackett drive and love my community and my town. A couple of years ago, I was a "foster mom" for the Humane Society. Two years ago, I fostered a litter of six. Out of that litter, only one survived, "Pumpkin." What a sweetie. Calm, happy, playful. Always on my lap and at his "dad's" feet at bedtime.

Last night he did not come in. We fretted and called his name, as this was unlike him. This morning, we were happy he was here! However, he was listless, not taking food or water. We found a wound and naturally thought ... cat fight (though that was not like him). My dear husband took him immediately to White Pine Veterinary Clinic. To our HORROR the truth was, he was shot with a pellet gun.

White Pine tried valiantly to save him. To no avail. It punctured his spleen. He made it all the way home ... crawled I assume (the trooper that he was) but it was too much.

Please, if your children are shooting pellet guns talk to them! I have been a school counselor for 20 years (Highland High). Kids who randomly shoot cats have problems, period. That is the truth. Don't deny it. Get help. If you are an adult who shot my cat, I do not know what to say, other than, get some therapy right away.

There it is. I have NEVER written a letter to The Park Record. I love my town. But truly, I am totally, as my kids say, "freaked out." Who would do this?

Karrie Jarratt

Park City

Park City kids do live in a bubble

Editor:

Definition of a Bubble: A term used to refer to a good or fortunate situation that is isolated from reality. Park City is a bubble. I love our little bubble passionately, however a bubble it is. To deny this is a misperception. The majority of students at Park City High School enjoy an institution of white privilege (rights and advantages granted to white persons just because we're white). We go home to a large well-furnished house, eat as much as we want, buy something online if we're in the mood, worry about what skis to put on this years Christmas list - this list has few bounds.

The fundamental fact of the matter is that these advantages are beyond those available in most communities: everyone has problems, however we enjoy unthinkably less dramatic problems then the average American, especially compared to those who are not white. I find it shameful that anyone in our advantaged community not only has the nerve to be ignorant of these facts, but also has the bravado to come out and say that Sherman Alexie was wrong to publically state these undeniably true facts. It is disgusting that this issue even needs to be addressed. Anyone and everyone (especially the adults) speaking out against Sherman Alexie for "bullying" us or "denigrating" us on the basis that he called us "over privileged shitheads," or told us that "white people have urination privileges" should be embarrassed.

I can promise you that Alexie is much too compassionate to believe we are inherently "shit heads," but was simply using those vulgar terms as hyperbole to drive his main point across that white privilege is real and that we grow up in a bubble and it is important for us to be aware of this fact. Get out of the damn 5th grade: people use swears words in this world. The only actual "shit heads" in this situation are those persons vilifying Alexie's valiant and awesome efforts to try and bring this truth to our eyes. Awareness is not something to denigrate, and I applaud everyone who contributed to bringing Mr. Alexie into our school.

Sully Tesch

Park City High School

For this couple Park City is 'city of love'

Editor:

We arrived in Park City in the middle of October ready for anything with mountain bikes, back-country skis and energy to burn. Who knew the love and warmth of Park City would lead us to the Mayor to unite us in marriage. Our spontaneous decision was greeted with joy and love that assured us it was the right place and time to unite our lives together. We would like to thank Summit County and Mayor Dana Williams for making a lasting magical memory.

Good on you friends

Alan & Kimie Bland

Twin Falls, Idaho

Student defends Sherman Alexie's presentation

Editor:

As an officer and active participant of Park City High School's Debate Club I feel an obligation to address the continuing controversy of Sherman Alexie. I read his book, and sat in on two of his lectures. What he said was controversial, arguably shocking, but that was what it was supposed to be. However, I believe that this issue has been vastly over-hyped, so I feel compelled to give a hopefully more accurate, rst-person account of his lectures. I would also like to address the fact that there are much more imminent district issues in all levels from teachers to administrators, to the school board that need to be dealt with before the Alexie issue is addressed.

In the two lectures I was present at, Alexie did not attempt to shy away from shock value, calling out individuals (including myself), as well as the whole group, saying something to the effect of: "You are all a bunch of terri ed, wimpy, white Liberals" and "You people have no idea what it is like to be a (racial) minority," going in deeper to try to get us to empathize with minorities in areas with more racial tension, but he never lied. He simply stated that we were extremely privileged (this is true) as a community, and especially as a school. He said many other controversial things, but they were all either in an attempt to open our eyes to reality outside of upper class Caucasian Suburbia, or to keep the attention of over a hundred easily bored teens. More importantly, he made us think about things that we wouldn't think about. Among other things, he put us in the place of an African-American in a white suburb of the Deep South, and a Native American stuck in a white community in Western Washington State.

I also think that it is worth mentioning that he only made intelligent arguments, the students to make intelligent rebuttals, instead they just bit their tongues, not having enough knowledge to know what to say to adequately defend themselves. This is because of the lack of intelligence that exists within the school, a fault that exists not with the teachers, but with the administration that sets preposterous limits on teachers because administrators fear the power given to the people by the seventh amendment, typically the same people who attack things like the Author in Residence program.

There are plenty of problems more prevalent than a little "shock therapy." Issues like the new and ineffective tardy policy (that many teachers argue inhibits their educational process), or the extreme drug and alcohol problem among students.

As a student I felt compelled to let the community know what the issues were from a student's perspective.

Will Griffith

Park City

Alcohol forum offered a 'Deeper Understanding'

Editor,

I want to express my appreciation to the hosts and participants of the "Through a Glass, Darkly" forum at St. Luke's on November 7. This was part of The Project for Deeper Understanding and focused on Utah's Liquor Laws, specifically the "Intent to Dine" and Separate Dispensing Area (aka the Zion Curtain) requirements. These, and other liquor laws, and the many different licenses held by eating and drinking establishments are quite confusing and perhaps limiting in terms of growth of tourism and culinary recognition in Utah; however, they appear to be in place due to genuine best intentions and with some recognition of tourists and a diversifying population. The panel of state legislators and restaurateurs, moderated by Rep. Kraig Powell, did an excellent job of covering the topic with clarity and context that made it much more understandable for me (and my guests from out of state). There were also some great audience questions that livened up the discussion.

This is the second forum I have attended and I have walked away from each more knowledgeable and open-minded. I'm grateful for the wonderful effort that Rev. Robinson and St. Luke's are making, organizing the Project and offering a venue for people with differing opinions to share their perspectives. I encourage everyone in the community to attend any future forums that are held.

Steve Spaulding

Park City