Carefully Consider Bus Lanes

Editor:

The proposed bus-only lanes for the upcoming Sundance Film Festival create safety risks that decision makers must address. Last year, drivers of passenger vehicles illegally used the bus lanes, enforcement was inadequate, and the buses traveled at high rates of speed in the lanes. The buses traveled at speeds that were dramatically different from the vehicles they were passing. It was common to see buses traveling at speeds of 45+ mph while passing inches from cars that were stopped in the regular traffic lanes. I witnessed several instances where buses had to swerve or brake to not hit vehicles illegally entering or exiting the bus-only lane. Passenger vehicles frequently violated the law by driving caravan-style directly behind buses in the bus-only lane.

The bus-only lanes created the conditions for road rage because of the temptation to illegally use the bus lanes and poor enforcement of the bus-only restrictions. I saw many instances when drivers traveling in the legal lanes veered into the bus-only lane to block the advance of passenger vehicles illegally traveling in the bus-only lane. Offensive hand signals and angry words were often exchanged.

While it was frustrating to be stuck in traffic and watch as other citizens illegally passed my vehicle, it was offensive to see courtesy vehicles sporting a Sundance Film Festival placard use the bus-only lanes. I saw this over a dozen times. Often these Sundance Film Festival vehicles were followed by several other passenger vehicles in a monkey-see-monkey-do caravan. Were Sundance Film Festival vehicles given special permission to use the shoulder lane? Unlikely.

Decision makers must consider that humans are not logical when placed in a pressured setting such as a two-mile-long traffic jam. Instead, emotions rule the decision-making process, particularly for individuals who are not residents of this area and feel entitled to special privileges. Bus-only lanes are successful in other communities because the lanes are clearly designated for such traffic and enforcement is rigorous. The signage last year was inadequate. The signs were comprised of signs filled with words, lacking any images. The intent of the lanes was not obvious unless a driver was concerned with strictly obeying the law. Additionally, most drivers in this area are not accustomed to bus-only lanes and may have been tempted to test the limits of enforcement. The drivers of Sundance Film Festival courtesy cars may have believed that their status entitled them to special privileges. Unfortunately, I only saw a few tepid attempts to enforce the bus-only designation.

While the bus lanes may have improved the speed of mass transit last year, the execution of the concept and enforcement of the law was dangerously inadequate. Future use of the bus-only lanes should be approved only with improved signage, rigorous enforcement of the bus-only restriction, and by placing a speed restriction on the bus-only lane of no more than 20 mph. This will require the allocation of real resources that cost money. If bus-only lanes are used for the upcoming Sundance Film Festival, decision makers must be willing to allocate those resources in order to control the dangerous conditions that I observed last year.

Scott Johansen

Park City

Another senior disappointed in Canyons

Editor,

Bravo for Elizabeth Wall's letter.

I had similar complaints with Canyon employees. Having enjoyed the Super Senior discounts for many years, I am very disappointed with Vail's offering !!

I do not care about any out-of-state ski areas !! I retired here for the snow !!

And I might add that Canyon now will also NOT get the lift tickets for my friends as well as all my children and grandchildren !!

Hopefully they will reconsider ??

Respectfully,

Klaus P Romeis

Park City

Another skier laments loss of Senior Ski Pass

In Wednesday's Viewpoint or Letter to The Editor you told it like it is. I would like to add my two cents:

With Vail, and most large corporations, the bottom line is usually the almighty dollar. These people believe that we seniors will simply not add many dollars to their coffers.They believe that we are not worth the trouble! I am acquainted with several seniors who will no longer vacation here as a result of Vail's new policy.

Finally, I am very thankful that PCMR still offers a special pass for seniors. I'm additionally thankful that with this pass and an "add on",I can also ski three days each at Alta,Snowbird and Deer Valley on any day this season.

For me, this beats the Hell out of Vail's so called "Epic Pass"! So, once again, THANKS Elizabeth Wall for telling it like it is.

Very Truly,

Barry Bea

Park City