A helicopter disseminates seed across the Rockport burn area on Friday as part of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources  reseeding efforts. (Photo
A helicopter disseminates seed across the Rockport burn area on Friday as part of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources reseeding efforts. (Photo courtesy of Scott Walker)

Reseeding of the Rockport burn scar area occurred on Friday, as biologists attempted to revegetate the almost 2,000-acre area that was devastated by a wildfire in August.

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources disseminated roughly 32,000 pounds of a diverse mix of grasses, shrubs and flowering plants, according to DWR Habitat Program Manager Scott Walker.

"We had a diverse mix [of seeds] selected to be adaptive to the site. The grasses provide soil stabilization and the shrubs provide a good diversity to the vegetative community and provide wildlife with the habitat we're looking for," Walker said.

The reseeding process took roughly six hours, and Walker said the wind was down for most of the day, making the process run much more smoothly.

next spring, Walker said the plants that have been seeded will begin germinating. Many of the native plants in the Rockport area have sprouted again, he added.

The Natural Resources Conservation Service has been installing erosion control barriers around Rockport Estates that will serve to mitigate the effects of any potential sediment runoff that could impact hills and roads such as State Road 32.

"With revegetation, this is our window. Right after the fire, as you wait, there's not a lot you can do as far as vegetation goes without a lot of energy being put into the system," Walker said.



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Seeds of various grasses, shrubs and flowering plants are loaded to be spread across the Rockport burn area by a helicopter on Friday. The seed mix was
Seeds of various grasses, shrubs and flowering plants are loaded to be spread across the Rockport burn area by a helicopter on Friday. The seed mix was selected to be adaptive to the environment and provide soil stabilization. (Photo courtesy of Scott Walker)