A developer in Deer Valley, seeking a change to a hard-fought approval, started its discussions with a City Hall panel Wednesday night.

The project is known as Stein Eriksen Residences and the site is situated off Silver Lake Drive close to the Evergreen and Bellemont neighborhoods. It had been known for years as the North Silver Lake development and was rebranded recently as a result of an agreement between the developer, Regent Properties, and the company that operates Stein Eriksen Lodge and The Chateaux Deer Valley.

The developer wants City Hall to allow lockout units within the project, a category of lodging that uses interior doors to split an individual unit into two or more units. It is a popular lodging category for owners intending to put the units into a rental pool.

The project encompasses 54 units, a mix of houses and condominiums. The lockout units would be limited to the condominiums. They would be put in buildings situated in the interior of the site.

The developer said Wednesday night it is seeking 85 lockout units, down from the 124 that were identified in an earlier iteration. Rich Lichtenstein, who represents the developer, said the drop in numbers occurred after a miscalculation was discovered. The developer said the agreement with Stein Eriksen Lodge Management Corp. calls for the lockout units.

The Park City Planning Commission was not scheduled to make a decision on Wednesday night. The panel members spent time discussing topics like the number of parking spaces that would be built at Stein Eriksen Residences.


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Brooke Hontz, a Planning Commissioner, said people should not be encouraged to park at the site. Lichtenstein said marketing materials will discourage guests from bringing vehicles.

Russ Olsen, the CEO of Stein Eriksen Lodge Management Corp., meanwhile, offered an overview of the agreement between his firm and the developer, saying that it was an exciting arrangement with opportunities for business growth. He said Stein Eriksen Lodge offers management expertise.

"We make sure things are done the right way," Olsen said.

The Planning Commission took input from a few project critics. They included Lisa Wilson, who has challenged the development at various stages in recent years. Wilson questioned property-tax numbers related to the site and broached the topic of trust deeds. Charlie Wintzer, a member of the Planning Commission, told Wilson the panel was not discussing topics like those. Wilson has previously attempted to broach those sorts of topics at City Hall meetings with limited success.

Bob Dillon, an American Flag resident, told the Planning Commission the project was not approved as a hotel and wondered how the reconfigured development would be operated.

The Planning Commission could continue its discussions at a meeting on Nov. 20. A hearing and vote could be held in early December.