City briefs | ParkRecord.com

City briefs

PR

Clean Up week starts

City Hall starting May 10 will put 18 Dumpsters throughout Park City for the annual Clean Up, a program that allows Parkites to throw out items that are too big for the regular trash.

The Clean Up ends May 18. The Dumpsters usually become filled with furniture and other items Parkites sometimes save for the Clean Up.

"It allows people to clean out their garage," says Pace Erickson, the Public Works Department official who oversees the program, adding that the program helps keep Park City clear of items discarded on roadsides.

Park City prohibits people from leaving hazardous materials like paint, gasoline and oil in the Dumpsters. The city also refuses to accept construction waste.

Big signs will be fastened to the Dumpsters designating them as part of Clean Up, and City Hall does not want people leaving their items outside the Dumpsters.

Recommended Stories For You

Erickson encourages people to make sure they are not putting recyclable materials in the Dumpsters, which will be emptied into a landfill.

The program typically costs City Hall between $10,000 and $15,000, according to Erickson.

The Dumpsters will be at the following locations:

( The turnaround at the top of Main Street

( Meadows Drive across the street from the Park Meadows Country Club golf clubhouse

( The intersection of Meadows Drive and S.R. 224

( Rotary Park

( Prospector Park

( Prospector Avenue parking lot, close to the building at 1910 Prospector Ave.

( Solamere Drive at Snow Cloud Circle

( Aspen Springs Drive

( Deer Valley Resort’s Snow Park Lodge parking lot

( Racquet Club

( West side of skateboard park at City Park

( Sandridge parking lot

( Woodside Avenue at 14th Street

( Eastern entrance of the Public Works Building, 1053 Iron Horse Drive

( Mellow Mountain Road between the April Mountain and Aerie subdivisions

For more information about the Clean Up program, call Erickson at 615-5311.

Water, trees celebrated

Park City officials celebrated drinking water with a week that ends on May 10.

The Park City Council agreed to make May 4-10 National Drinking Water Week. They also adopted similar measures regarding tourism and Arbor Day, which is May 10.

The proclamation calls water "our most valuable natural resource," and it says low death rates, economic growth and public safety "are in some way related to access to safe water."

The officials pledge to ensure the drinking water is safe and reliable, and they want people to keep water sources safe from pollution and to conserve water.

Securing enough water and making sure it is clean has long challenged City Hall, which relies heavily on melting snow for its drinking water. Some of the water comes from underground sources, making the drinking water susceptible to contaminants.

Meanwhile, City Hall says it will increase security around waterworks facilities, a response to a recent breach of the Quarry Mountain water tank in Park Meadows.

The Arbor Day proclamation says trees can reduce heating and cooling costs and protect topsoil from erosion, among other benefits. Trees are a "source of joy and spiritual renewal," it says.

"Trees in our community increase property values, enhance the economic vitality of business areas, and beautify our city," the proclamation says, urging Parkites to plant trees in an effort to boost the "beauty of our mountain community."

Compiled by Jay Hamburger

Go back to article