City Councilman opts not to seek municipal recycling contract | ParkRecord.com

City Councilman opts not to seek municipal recycling contract

by Jay Hamburger THE PARK RECORD

Park City Councilman Joe Kernan is not seeking a City Hall contract to provide recycling services, a decision that means the other City Councilors will not be put into a situation in which they would need to approve or reject a bid from another elected official.

Kernan said in an interview the decision was based on business strategies rather than his position on the City Council. Kernan owns Good Earth Recycling and holds a 50 percent stake in County Curbside Inc., which is another recycling firm.

He said he reviewed the contract City Hall currently has with another firm before deciding against submitting a bid. He said the firm that now holds the contract, Curb It Recycling, is performing well.

"Curb It’s doing a great job. I decided not to submit a bid," Kernan said.

Tyler Poulson, who coordinates City Hall’s environmental programs, reported two firms submitted bids for the contract. Curb It Recycling wants to be retained. The other bid was filed by a firm called Ace Recycling & Disposal.

City Hall wants to hire a firm to pick up recyclables in seven bins on Main Street as well as bins at City Park, the Quinn’s Junction sports complex and Rotary Park. The deal does not encompass recycling services in neighborhoods.

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The current contract with Curb It Recycling expires on Sept. 30. It costs City Hall approximately $25,000 each year, Poulson has said. He has said the municipal government is interested in a three-year contract with an option for a two-year renewal. Officials want the new contract to go into effect Oct. 1. The City Council is expected to select one of the firms in August.

Kernan is a two-term member of the City Council. He plans to retire from the City Council at the end of his term, scheduled in early January. Had Kernan submitted a bid for the recycling contract, conflict-of-interest rules would have prohibited him from participating in the selection process and the eventual awarding of the contract.

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