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Education briefs

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Winter storm pushes schools to close

Superintendents Steve Carlsen of North Summit School District and Barry Walker of South Summit School District announced that School will be cancelled Wednesday, Nov 24th. This cancellation is due to predicted blizzard weather conditions. School will resume Monday, Nov 29th. For updates and further information visit the district websites at http://www.nsummit.org and http://www.ssummit.k12.ut.us . Park City School District had already scheduled Thanksgiving Break to begin Wednesday.

Students raise money for Ugandan sister school

On Friday November 19, 2010 David Ssejenga, founder of the Ssejenga Foundation, spoke to Treasure Mountain International School students. The foundation helped rebuild and continues to enhance Treasure Mountain’s sister school in Uganda. Students spent last year raising money and backpacks for the school, which recently went to Uganda with Ssejenga.

Eighth-grade English classes in the school set a goal to collect as many pennies as there are orphans in Africa. School administrators put up a chest in the Lunchroom and students have donated about 30,000 pennies so far. Donations will continue through the coming years.

Treasure Mountain students and faculty plan to continue to raise money for the Ssejenga Foundation, with hopes to take a group of service volunteers to the Uganda sister-school in 2012.

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Alive at 25 available at Park City High School

Park City School District partnered with the Utah Safey Council and the Summit County Health Department to offer "Alive at 25," a safe driving class aimed at reducing traffic accidents for drivers from ages 15 to 24. Those interested in taking the course can register by calling 800-933-5943 ext 303 or online at http://www.utahsafetycouncil.org . The course fee is $30 and scholarships may be available. The next available class is scheduled for Wednesday, Dec. 8 at Park City High School.

Recent studies suggest young-adult driving accidents account for about 44 percent of all teen deaths, making it the leading cause of death among teenagers in the United States.

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