Festival briefs | ParkRecord.com

Festival briefs

PR

Parking becomes pricier

People planning to park downtown during the Sundance Film Festival need to bring extra money.

City Hall has introduced higher prices during the festival. Officials say they do not want to make more money from the festival-goers. Instead, they want to discourage people from driving to Old Town by charging the higher prices.

During the festival, parking on Main Street costs $1 for the first hour, $5 for the second hour and $10 for the third hour. The prices are the same as City Hall charged during the 2006 festival.

There is a three-hour limit on Main Street.

Normally, parking on the street costs $1 per hour.

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Meanwhile, the local government will charge drivers $20 per day for parking on Swede Alley, a block east of Main Street, and those parking in the China Bridge expansion. Parking in those locations is typically free.

Levels one through three of the old China Bridge garage is restricted to people paying $300 for festival parking or upgrading $75 passes they already hold. The upgrade costs $225. The fourth level of the garage is reserved for people holding the $75 pass.

Drivers frequently overrun Old Town during the festival and officials hope the higher parking prices will convince them to park elsewhere, reducing the congestion.

Traffic is especially bad during the festival’s two weekends.

The city has kept free the approximately 100 spaces in the Sandridge lots, situated off Marsac Avenue. They are the only off-street, free public spots in downtown. Parking on neighborhood streets surrounding Main Street is generally restricted to people who live there and their guests. People on those streets need passes to park there.

Publicity hounds warned

Park City officials during the film festival plan to enforce rules barring people from handing out fliers, stickers and other material filmmakers use to promote their movies.

The city has published what it calls the ‘Rules of the road’ for the 2007 edition of film-festival week, outlining lots of the city’s regulations.

Giving out handbills, which City Hall loosely defines to include fliers, posters and other materials, outside a building is not allowed. Inside it is allowed.

The city puts up big temporary boards where people can post the material. The boards normally are covered quickly and eventually several layers are posted onto them.

Officials do not allow people to market movies from a car or show movies in a car, a motor home or a trailer. They cannot use a megaphone or speakers, the rules say.

People frequently are seen breaking the rules, especially on Main Street, where scores of filmmakers and their marketing teams try to generate buzz about their movies.

Some of the city’s other rules include:

( People can show movies in restaurants and convention spaces but not in stores. A license is needed from City Hall. The city says occupancy and fire-code restrictions prevent movies from being shown elsewhere.

( Those who are renting space, like a store on Main Street, must obtain a business license before opening a hospitality suite or similar function. Those arrangements are popular on Main Street.

( People are not allowed to rent a condominium or house for commercial uses and parties are barred from being bigger than the maximum occupancy. The city does not allow admission charges or allow people to charge for products or services during parties.

( The Building Department must approve requests to add lights to the outside of a building. The city says spotlights and floodlights are not allowed and "illegal lighting will be cited, fined, and removed."

Compiled by Jay Hamburger

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