Gallery goes retro | ParkRecord.com

Gallery goes retro

Dan Bischoff, Of the Record Staff

Dave Newman s The Road to Dinky s.

The Terzian gallery is presenting 30 new pieces from one of Park City’s favorite artists during the Arts Festival, which will take place August 5-6.

Dave Newman, whose work is featured in the Terzian all year, will be present at the gallery from 5 to 9 p.m. each day to sign items and talk with clients and fans of his work.

"This is the second year we’re bringing him back, by demand. He’s a one-person show," said Karen Terzian, the founder of the gallery. "When I think about my top-selling artists, Dave is at the top. He was the top-selling artist in the year 2005," Terzian said.

Terzian credits Newman’s popularity to his unique style of putting together art that is reminiscent of the oldies.

"The response here is great, his theme and style appeals to a lot of people in this area. A lot of people in my generation really dig old things," she said. "Everything is one-of-a-kind originals," Terzian said. "We will be showing mixed media collages, acrylic paintings and sculptures he calls totems."

Emily Chaney, the manager of the Terzian gallery agrees. She not only appreciates his art, which encapsulates the past, but also the patriotic nature of his work.

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"Dave Newman brings with him the American spirit along with visual memories of flashing neon signs, vintage toasters, and old Western heroes," Chaney wrote in an email.

His art has been collected by high profile people all over the country.

"Many corporations and private collectors have acquired Newman’s work, including Warner Brothers Records, Fender Guitars, and Waste Management. He has been showcased in the Laguna Beach Art Museum, the Route 66 Museum Group Show, the Sun Valley Center, and the Sausalito art show," said Chaney.

Newman has been looking for art opportunities since he was a small child.

"His work contains memories from his childhood, pictures of signs and images from the 1950s," Chaney said. "He would be looking out the back window of his parents’ car as they cruised along Anaheim’s streets, the road signs embedded into his visual memory. He finds items that speak of the past by searching junkyards, garage sales, and antique shows. Road trips often influence his work, by using photos taken and sometimes even finding interesting objects on the side of the road."

Each piece he creates is original and unique.

"He also hand-builds furniture and includes old photos of Roy Rogers and John Wayne and makes collages of them and stains the wood," Terzian said. "He does mirrors and creates collages with a jewelry line; he does tiny picture frames, things in a lot of different price points. He just loves finding things; he finds a unique object and builds something out of it. He’ll find things off the side of the road. I’ve seen him make things out of gears. It’s a wide group of work."

Newman, according to Chaney, wants each viewer to perceive the pieces in his or her own way.

"There are many different layers to my work," Newman said.

One, Cheney said, is viewing the pieces as individual time capsules that document the past while looking to the future. By mixing images there is something new to see in his work. Each piece has a different feeling and often will create humor and seriousness combined inside one piece.

"I use photographs I’ve taken, acrylic paint, wood, metal, silk-screened images, and found objects of all kinds to weave stories into my work," Newman said.

Although Newman isn’t from Park City, he’s no stranger to the resort town. He told the Terzian Gallery that Park City has become his second home.

"For 11 years, he and his wife Donna traveled the Southwest showing his work at different art festivals. They’ve been traveling to Park City for eight years," Chaney said.

The relationship between the Terzian Gallery and Newman started a few years ago at the Park City Arts Festival.

"I got introduced to him by attending the arts festival and I have seen his work for years. I’ve always admired it, I collect things from the 50s and 60s," Terzian said. "I’ve been in the business 21 years and I asked him if he’d be interested in the gallery. It’s been a great relationship that’s been fruitful for both of us."

Last year, Newman gave complimentary gifts to those who purchased his items.

"He made handmade little plaques for each client that was collecting his work. He gave them to anyone who bought something. Everybody got a plaque, a piece of memorabilia of fun Western things. I wouldn’t be surprised if he did something like this again."

The gallery scheduled the reception so it wouldn’t interfere with the festival and so Newman wouldn’t have to sit outside in the heat all day. The festival will run from noon until 6 p.m. Spectators can then go to the Terzian afterwards.

"We won’t take anything away from festival," Terzian said. "We support it. We are a supporter of the Kimball Arts Center.

Terzian is grateful for the adjustments the Kimball Art Center has made to the festival. A few years ago, Terzian said a lot of business owners in the Main Street area were upset. In years past, booths blocked the entrances to restaurants and stores and caused a lot of public angst.

"The Kimball has done some really great things," Terzian said. "The thing they’ve done is move the booths to interior spots that has made everyone happy and doesn’t hinder sales of artist at the same time. It’s just really nice now."

The Terzian Gallery will showcase Dave Newman during the Park City Arts Festival Aug. 5-6 from 5 to 9 p.m. After the Arts Festival, the Terzian Gallery will continue to run the gamut of Newman items through Aug. 16. For more information, call the Terzian Gallery at 649-4927

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