Hurwitz uses her pen to encourage people to walk | ParkRecord.com

Hurwitz uses her pen to encourage people to walk

She just published ‘A Walker’s Guide to Park City’

Beverly Hurwitz, an avid cyclist, noticed something when she started taking more walks.

Instead of zooming by plants and wildlife on her bike, she was able to stop and smell the roses — or in her case, the sunflowers, sage and other wild-growing plants found in Utah.

"Low and behold, I saw things I never saw, touched things I never touched and smelled things I never smelled," Hurwitz told The Park Record as she trekked up the gradual incline of Lah Dee Duh trail, one of many walks included in a book she penned and recently published.

Titled "A Walker's Guide to Park City," Hurwitz's book lists 30 walking routes located in the greater Park City area. Some are on paved roads in Old Town, while others are dirt trails meant to "whet appetites for hiking," as Hurwitz phrased it. The book is available on Amazon.com and at select stores in town, such as the Market at Park City and Park City Hospital's gift shop.

Hurwitz said the idea to write a walking guide came from a desire to show people Park City can be a pedestrian-friendly place.

"I want to get people out of cars and reduce Park City's auto congestion," she said as she looked at the view from the beginning of the 1.3-mile Lah Dee Duh loop, which is part of Round Valley's trail network. The sight before her included a glance of the Snyderville Basin and a cloudy sky.

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Hurwitz said Park City's future is one with more pedestrian connections to amenities, adding fewer cars in town mean better air quality. Perhaps heated sidewalks could be installed in Old Town to make snow removal and winter walking easier, she suggested.

But in addition to using her writing to promote potential walkability in town and the environmental benefits of taking a stroll up Main Street, instead of driving it, Hurwitz wants people who read her book to realize walking is a great form of exercise.

"It's kind of the Rodney Dangerfield of exercise. It gets no respect," she said, referencing the well-known comedian's catchphrase before listing a benefit of walking. "It doesn't have the danger elements of skiing or mountain biking."

Hurwitz, a physician who moved to town in 1990 for the ski slopes, is hoping "A Walker's Guide to Park City" will encourage tourists to burn a few calories while enjoying the town's landscape. She also hopes the book will prompt Park City's ardent recreationists to give slowing down a try, although she doesn't think there's anything wrong with biking or skiing.

"I think residents will be surprised by what they learn about Park City when they walk," she said.

And Hurwitz believes the trails listed in her book will be a great way to begin an education of Utah's flora and fauna.

In addition to bus route directions to the walks, the guide includes descriptions of the paths and notable features people should be on the lookout for. For the Old Town Via Park City Resort walk, the book lists notable architecture that can be spotted. Also included in the guide are rules for walking etiquette and descriptions of Park City's available activities, animals, vegetation, minerals and weather.

"There is so much ecology you can learn about and so much you can gain when walking," Hurwitz said as she stood near a prickly pear cactus that is yet to bloom. "I wanted to share that with people, so I wrote this book."

"A Walker's Guide to Park City," written by Beverly Hurwitz, is now available at the Market at Park City, Cole Sport, Park City Hospital's One Cart Gift Shop, and on Amazon.com. It will soon be stocked at Dolly's Bookstore, Cahoots and Jans Mountain Outfitters. Hurwitz also plans to have a book signing at Dolly's Bookstore from 1-3 p.m. on June 11.

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