Park City orders repairs to decrepit Old Town structures | ParkRecord.com

Park City orders repairs to decrepit Old Town structures

City Hall wants two historic structures toward the southern end of Daly Avenue to be repaired. The structure in the foreground dates to 1892 and was once a silver mining-era house, according to the municipal government. The other structure was a shed or a garage where a neighbor used to park a vehicle up until as late as 2015, City Hall says.

Tucked toward the southern end of Daly Avenue, generations of hikers, bicyclists and occasional tourists have watched two mining-era structures fall into disrepair and then into the decrepit state of today.

Seemingly barely standing nowadays, the doors are gone or barely present, wooden planks are falling off the sides and the roofs are showing their age. The insides, visible, look awful.

City Hall recently issued the owner of the structures, United Park City Mines, a notice and order to repair them. There seemed to be little progress by late in September, though.

The structures are located close to what, a century ago, had been important silver-mining sites, and they are emblematic of the bare buildings that quickly went up in what decades later became Old Town.

Anya Grahn, the preservation planner at City Hall, said one of the structures once was a single-room house where miners lived. It dates to 1892, she said. The other structure had been a shed or a garage for a house that was located just downhill and is now gone. Grahn said a neighbor used the shed or garage to park a vehicle up until recent years.

City Hall puts the address of the two remaining structures as 360 Daly Ave. Both of the buildings are uninhabitable, Grahn said. They are listed as significant, though, on an inventory of historic structures kept by the municipal government. Such a listing prohibits the demolition of either of the structures.

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Grahn said City Hall has received an application requesting the relocation of the shed or garage to the other side of the house. The shed or garage, she said, complicates the prospects of development. She said the structure extends five or six feet across a lot line, something that requires an additional step in the development process.

Grahn said it would be best if the structures are stabilized as a result of the City Hall notice and order. She said cables could perhaps be used for stabilization.

Over the years, particularly during the various hot housing markets, many owners of historic structures in Old Town have spent significant money rehabilitating them individually or as part of a broader development. There are numerous examples in the neighborhood of historic structures being incorporated into new houses. The condition of the structures at 360 Daly Ave., though, appears to be worse than many of the others that have been rehabilitated in some fashion.

United Park City Mines, which is now under the umbrella of the Talisker corporate family, is the modern-day successor to the historic silver-mining industry. It has focused on real-estate development, though, in recent decades, most notably securing the approvals for the project that became Empire Pass. It still has land holdings in the Park City area.

A representative of United Park City Mines did not immediately return a phone message seeking comment about the structures at 360 Daly Ave.

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