Tim Henney, trails and open space advocate, seeks City Council spot | ParkRecord.com

Tim Henney, trails and open space advocate, seeks City Council spot

Jay Hamburger THE PARK RECORD

Tim Henney, a trails and open space advocate, on Monday began a bid for a seat on the Park City Council, saying it is the right time to serve in elected office and stressing a campaign that will be based on a broad definition of diversity.

Henney is 54 years old and lives in Old Town. He has lived in Park City since 1992. He is a real estate investor and manager.

Henney serves on City Hall’s open space panel, known as the Citizens Open Space Advisory Committee. The group considers opportunities for conservation purchases and then recommends which ones should be pursued by the mayor and Park City Council.

He also holds an officer’s position with Mountain Trails Foundation, a not-for-profit organization that promotes trail use and etiquette.

"They affect the quality of life and fabric of this community in a multitude of ways," Henney said about open space and trails.

He said the City Hall campaign this year is the right time for him to seek elected office, saying doing so fits with his public service to date.

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"I just think it’s time in my life . . . to take the next step," Henney said.

Henney said his City Council campaign will stress issues like the economy and Park City’s architecture. He wants an expanded trail network, more land conserved and a more diverse housing stock.

His economic platform has not been finalized, though. He said he wants to expand the resort economy while also diversifying the economy. Henney said City Hall is able to offer incentives in an effort to reach those goals. He did not provide details about programs he would support.

Henney, meanwhile, said he would like the architecture of Park City to move away from the mining-era look that has been critical to leaders for years. He envisions an "evolution toward something different." He said a contemporary look or another modern style is preferred.

Henney said City Hall over the years has done well preserving the mining-era look, but he sees a building like the Sky Lodge as an example of his idea of more contemporary architecture.

"I think it’s been fairly homogenous," Henney said about the mining-era look, adding, "That job is done."

Henney was the first person to file campaign paperwork at City Hall who had not previously announced their intention to be a candidate. The two incumbent City Councilors whose seats are on the ballot — Alex Butwinski and Cindy Matsumoto — filed paperwork on Monday as well.

If more than four people seek the two City Council spots, a primary election would be held in August to whittle the field to four for Election Day.

The two people who had previously said they will seek the mayor’s office — City Councilman Andy Beerman and Park City Planning Commissioner Jack Thomas — formalized their campaigns on Monday by filing the necessary paperwork at City Hall. Another mayoral candidate would force a primary election to reduce the field to two for Election Day.

The filing window when candidates must submit the paperwork opened Monday and closes at 5 p.m. on Friday. Someone seeking office in Park City must meet eligibility requirements of:

  • being a Park City resident for at least 12 consecutive months preceding Election Day
  • being a registered voter in Park City
  • being at least 18 years old by Election Day on Nov. 5
  • being a U.S. citizen

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