Women’s Giving Fund giving again | ParkRecord.com

Women’s Giving Fund giving again

The fund is accepting applications for its high-impact grant

Liza Greene's perception of Park City changed when her role with the Women's Giving Fund pushed her to view the community through a different lens.

As a member of the committee charged with distributing about $1.3 million in funds, Greene, 16, not only spent time last year helping narrow down a pool of grant applicants hoping for a near $30,000 piece of the pot, but also realized Park City has a population of people who sometimes go hungry, get abused or struggle to afford childcare.

"I feel like a lot of us live in a bubble of perfection here and can be so oblivious to others' needs," Greene said. "There are so many people here who are actually in need of the organizations that need this money so desperately."

Greene is looking forward to using her new outlook as she serves on the fund's committee for a second year. She said the group will soon mull over a pile of applications from organizations hoping to be selected as the 2017 recipient. The fund started accepting submissions on Monday.

"I'm so excited to see who is going to submit applications," said Greene, a junior at Park City High School and the fund's youngest committee member. "I feel like, compared to last year, I kind of understand more what the committee is looking for and what the grant mission is."

The deadline for grant applications is Feb. 9, and guidelines are online at parkcitycf.org/supporting-nonprofits/apply-for-a-grant.

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Organizations hoping for a donation of about $30,000 must be located in Summit County.

"It should also be a nonprofit that wants to propose a program that will have significant benefits to the lives of women and/or children," said Ollie Wilder, project manager for the Park City Community Foundation, which oversees the fund.

Last year, the committee Greene served on selected three finalists for a high-impact grant from the fund, which started three years ago with the goal of signing up 1,000 women promising to give $1,000 each.

"Now we're at about 1,300 women," Wilder said.

Once last year's committee tightened the list of applicants to three, the fund's entire membership voted for one recipient.

The 2016 winner was the Summit County Children's Justice Center, a place that makes children feel safe when they are meeting investigators to discuss allegations of abuse.

Greene said the nonprofit appealed to her and the other committee members right away.

"For the Summit County Justice Center, I knew the grant would have such a high impact, because it's using the money to put a sound system in their facility and also new couches," she said. "There are children coming there who are obviously in an uncomfortable situation.

"For them to be able to make that child more comfortable with new furniture is obviously super important."

Greene said the committee looks for nonprofits that clearly outline how they will use the money. She said once the members narrow the list down to six finalists, they visit each site to see if the organizations are in dire need of the high-impact grant.

"I know that the money for the Justice Center went exactly toward what they said in their actual application," Greene said. "When we went on their site visit you could tell that couches were what was actually needed."

Applications for the Women's Giving Fund grant must be emailed to Wilder at ollie@parkcitycf.org by Feb. 9. Finalists for the high-impact grant will be announced in April, and voting for the recipient opens June 5. Wilder said the winner will be announced at an awards ceremony set to take place in July.

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