Powdr Corp. chief: PCMR ‘not for sale’ | ParkRecord.com

Powdr Corp. chief: PCMR ‘not for sale’

by Jay Hamburger THE PARK RECORD

The CEO of Park City Mountain Resort parent Powdr Corp. made a rare appearance at a City Hall meeting on Thursday night, strongly dispelling any notion that the resort is on the market.

John Cumming, in an unanticipated comment, told Mayor Dana Williams and the Park City Council PCMR is "not for sale." He then said he could not foresee any circumstances that would lead Powdr Corp. to sell the resort.

Powdr Corp. is headquartered in Park City and owns mountain resorts across the U.S., including Copper Mountain in Colorado, Killington Resort in Vermont and Mt. Bachelor in Oregon. PCMR is considered the firm’s flagship. Cumming did not provide details about chatter about a sale that led him to make the comment.

In an interview afterward, Cumming reiterated his comments to the elected officials.

"Not for sale. They always amuse me," he said about rumors of a deal for PCMR.

Cumming has had a longtime presence in Park City as Powdr Corp. built itself into a formidable player in the ski industry. He normally does not act as a representative for PCMR during City Hall meetings, however.

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The resort has had regular business with the municipal government over the years, particularly in development-related matters. Resort executives or consultants have typically represented PCMR in those meetings.

Thursday’s meeting keyed on long-range ideas for the redevelopment of the PCMR base area and possibilities for improvements involving City Hall close to the resort.

The City Council, the Park City Planning Commission and City Hall staffers spoke about numerous ideas as a consultant led the discussion. The talk drew more people than is typical for a City Council meeting. Many in the audience appeared to have a stake in either PCMR’s future or what happens in the immediate neighborhood. One person from the audience provided input. Ruth Gezelius, an Old Town resident without ties to the resort, suggested work force housing be situated at the site, saying there would be more traffic if the housing was put elsewhere.

Michael Barille, who once was the planning director at the County Courthouse and is now a PCMR consultant, said the resort wants to ensure it is desirable to Parkites, that there is adequate work force housing and that it is easy to navigate for pedestrians. He said people movers and lifts could someday be used to shuttle people between locations at the base of the resort.

He said PCMR wants to reduce the number of drivers heading to and from the resort. Barille said the entryway to the resort could be remade and a transit hub could be built.

There appears to be the possibility that PCMR will seek some sort of partnership with City Hall on certain portions of the work. Barille mentioned that the resort and the municipal government, as an example, could team in some fashion on infrastructure like a parking garage. Without a partnership, he said, there could be a piecemeal development pattern that is less attractive. There was not a detailed discussion about a partnership, though, and the two sides would likely need to strike a wide-ranging agreement before one is formed. A timeline for more talks has not been outlined.

Buildings like the Marriott Mountainside and the Legacy Lodge went up in the years just after an overall approval in the 1990s for the redevelopment of the PCMR base area. PCMR continues to hold other development rights at its base dating from the 1990s approval.

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