Retiring chief inks consulting deal | ParkRecord.com

Retiring chief inks consulting deal

by Jay Hamburger OF THE RECORD STAFF

Police Chief Lloyd Evans has inked an agreement with City Hall to remain with the local government as a consultant for another six months after his scheduled midyear retirement.

Evans will be paid $50,000 for his work and receive another $25,000 worth of benefits as part of the agreement. He will assist Wade Carpenter, the incoming police chief. Evans also will seek grants and continue City Hall’s efforts to plan for emergencies.

Evans expects he will work on a full-time basis, both at the police station and from his house. He does not anticipate the consulting contract will be renewed. It runs July 1-Dec. 31.

The salary and benefits are slightly less valuable than what he would receive in six months in his current position. His annual salary as the police chief is set at between $93,526 and $112,200 and City Hall’s benefits package increases the value of his compensation.

"There is no parachute in this contract," Evans told City Councilors during a recent meeting about City Hall’s budget.

Evans said in an interview that planning for emergencies will be especially important, with the federal government requiring proof of planning before reimbursing the local government if a disaster strikes.

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He said City Hall must conduct exercises to meet Washington’s standards. Evans said he plans to assist with two exercises late in the fall. They will test the local government’s readiness for disasters like an earthquake or flood.

"I think we’ll do very well," Evans said, explaining that City Hall staffers have previously undergone training. He said the upcoming exercises will involve wider disasters than water emergencies Parkites have faced.

Evans has been the police chief since 1997 and has been a police officer in Park City since 1978. He said in December he planned to retire midyear. City Manager Tom Bakaly named Carpenter the successor in April.

"What I’m hoping for, obviously, is a smooth transition," Bakaly said.

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