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Student to Student

David Lambert, Park Record intern

St. Patrick’s Day is just around the corner and people are already starting to get into the spirit.

Last Saturday The Gateway Center was a sea of green even though St. Patrick’s Day was almost a full week away. So without question if you are in the right place next Friday, it will be a day to remember.

The thing about St. Patrick’s Day though is despite all the hype and excitement, does anyone actually know what they are celebrating?

If you ask someone they might say that it is celebration of St. Patrick, who drove out all the snakes in Ireland and that is probably all you will get you will be lucky to get it.

Unfortunately this is like saying we celebrate President’s Day because George Washington drove all the British out of America, there is so much more to it.

According to the History Channel’s Website and kidsdomain.com, Saint Patrick’s name at birth was Maewyn Succat, his journey began at 16 when he was captured in his native homeland of Britain by pirates and sold into slavery in Ireland were he worked as a Shepard.

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During this lonely time he found religion. He eventually escaped and changed his name to Patrick, a more respectable Christian name.

Once he was free, Patrick took refuge in a monastery in Gaul for twelve years before being appointed to go on a mission in Ireland. There he came up with using the shamrock as a symbol for the father, son, and the holey ghost.

With his amicable personality he was successful at converting people to what became the Catholic Church.

Patrick was so successful that he is credited with driving paganism out of Ireland. The snake was a pagan symbol, hence the common myth of him banishing the snakes from the land.

Wearing green on St. Patrick’s Day was a tradition that started hundreds of years later, and getting pinched for not doing it was purely a manifestation of school children.

So, there it is, why we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. It is ironic that we celebrate a Saint by dressing up like leprechauns, drinking green alcohol, and marching down the street in a drunken stupor.

Wouldn’t going to church or doing some good deed be a little more respectful?

As strange as St. Patrick’s Day is, think about Easter. We celebrate it by painting eggs and thinking a giant rabbit is coming to give you something made of chocolate. How did these ancient celebrations get so bizarre?

But then again, maybe this isn’t a bad thing when you think about it. If I had a holiday in my honor I would be happy to have it celebrated by people acting out of the ordinary and having a good time with friends and family.

What better way to be honored than by people having as much fun in your name as they can.

What do you think? Students, The Park Record has its own blog for students to shout out how they feel about "Student to Student," or any other topic. Join the cyber-realm today at prstudentblog.blogspot.com.

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