Doug Clyde prepares to represent the East Side on the Summit County Council | ParkRecord.com

Doug Clyde prepares to represent the East Side on the Summit County Council

Council member-elect will be sworn in Wednesday, Jan. 4

Doug Clyde, of Oakley, will be officially sworn in as a member of the Summit County Council on Wednesday. With the departure of incumbent Tal Adair, Clyde will be the only East Side representative on the five-member board.

Doug Clyde, of Oakley, will be officially sworn in as a member of the Summit County Council on Wednesday. With the departure of incumbent Tal Adair, Clyde will be the only East Side representative on the five-member board.

It has been a somewhat seamless transition for Summit County Council member-elect Doug Clyde as he prepares for his four-year term on the five-member board.

The former Eastern Summit County Planning Commissioner said his experience on the commission has been “very detailed and pertinent” to the work he will be doing on the council, especially within the first few weeks as the councilors revisit the proposed amendments to the East Side zoning districts.

Clyde will replace incumbent Claudia McMullin after he is officially sworn in as a council member at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 4, at the County Courthouse in Coalville. He was elected to the position after earning more votes than Snyderville Basin Planning Commissioner Colin DeFord.

For nearly 30 years, Clyde has been a prominent figure in Summit County and Park City development circles, working as a land consultant on some of the area’s largest projects, including Empire Pass and an expansion of the Park City Mountain Resort base-area. He is also connected to projects with Bill White Farms and the Park City Day School.

“I have done this for a living, working with government and land law, and everything I have done for the last 30 years has been about county and municipal law both in Park City and the county as well,” Clyde said.

One of the first significant items the County Council is expected to review in the coming weeks will be the partial rewrite of the Land Management Code and the land zoning ordinances for the East Side of the county.

Over the course of nearly three years, the Planning Commission crafted new ordinances to provide more options for landowners. It was a critical issue in Clyde’s campaign. He voted against the recommended changes.

“My opinions have not changed. That was a 4-3 split vote and I was in the three that voted against it,” Clyde said. “The three of us certainly recognized that the zoning that was proposed was not in the best interest of the public at large and that will certainly be one of the items that I carry forward.”

Clyde said the impacts of the proposed zoning has a cost and the question is “who bears the cost of the development,” which will likely impact water and air quality, as well as transportation.

“The purpose of government, in this regard, is to represent the health, safety and welfare of the public at large,” Clyde said. “All of those issues that have to do with what the impacts will be on our infrastructure. How does the zoning relate to that and what does it do to mitigate any of those impacts?

“And what does that do to the quality of life issue on the East Side?” Clyde said. “Are we still living in a rural county or a city?”

With the departure of Tal Adair, Clyde, an Oakley resident, will be the only East Side representative on the County Council. He said it is an obvious responsibility that comes with the position, especially considering his background on the commission.

“Looking at these planning and zoning issues. There is no question that they represent the potential for a huge change on the East Side,” he said. “It all needs to be looked at with considerable detail and with an eye to what the impact to a potential rezone might be.”

Clyde said he will also be committed to the discussions about sustainability and the impacts of development on water quality issues.

“Those are things we need to work on and set an example about how we lead on these issues, which are some of the more complicated issues we face today,” Clyde said.

Replacing Clyde on the commission

Once Clyde is sworn in as a council member, his seat on the Eastern Summit County Planning Commission will become open. As previously reported in The Park Record, the position will be advertised for one month, before the County Council, including Clyde, will begin conducting interviews.

Interested citizens must have resided in the planning district for at least one year. Clyde’s replacement will be appointed for the remainder of his term, which expires in February 2018.