Snyderville Basin Planning Commission nears stalemate over parking for Skullcandy building | ParkRecord.com

Snyderville Basin Planning Commission nears stalemate over parking for Skullcandy building

The Snyderville Basin Planning Commission and The Boyer Company are on the verge of a stalemate over parking for the new Skullcandy headquarters building, which will be located at the Park City Tech Center.

Planning commissioners recently met with representatives from The Boyer Company and Skullcandy to discuss aspects of the building’s final site plan that staff members say does not comply with the development agreement for the Park City Tech Center or the Basin’s development code. The discussion lasted for more than an hour.

"We did it as a work session because there were so many issues that it appeared the planning staff and Boyer couldn’t reach an agreement," said Bea Peck, planning commission chair. "There were so many of them it was a little unusual and we thought it was best to have more of an informal session have so we could have a lot more back and forth and brainstorming to talk about the details."

In September, Skullcandy announced it wanted to relocate its current headquarters from a location in Newpark to a new site behind the Park City Chamber of Commerce/Convention and Visitor’s Bureau. It has been located in the multi-tenant building in Newpark for nearly 10 years.

The new nearly 50,000-square-foot building would be the second constructed as part of the development on the west of State Road 224. Skullcandy, which specializes in audio equipment such as headphones and speakers, has 170 employees with the potential of growing to 220 in the near future.

Last month, Boyer and Skullcandy met with planning commissioners to discuss the building’s final site plan, which includes details such as parking, connectivity and setbacks. Boyer Company is requesting 231 parking spaces, which is 85 more than allowed by code, according to staff.

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The number of parking spaces for a project is determined on a 3:1 ratio based on gross square footage. The development code provides an exception for spaces beyond that, but they must be contained within a parking structure.

"This is perhaps the most critical issue being discussed tonight simply because there are few options for compromise. Either you build a parking structure or not," a memo drafted in anticipation of the meeting from Boyer stated.

In the code there is some allowance to go beyond the 3:1 ratio, but commissioners don’t want to, Peck said.

"We are under such pressure from the community to monitor traffic because it has certainly been expressed over and over by the community that they are worried about transportation and traffic and parking," Peck said. "Anyone involved in the process hears it and we live here so we can see it too."

County staff, The Boyer Company and Skullcandy representatives suggested coming up with alternative travel arrangements for employees, such as carpooling, or temporary options such as overflow parking lots.

"With all of those tenets in mind we were sort at a bit of a stalemate and that’s kind of where we left it," Peck said. "I still feel positive we will find a solution within the confines of the development agreement and I feel confident there is goodwill on both sides to find solutions to this without having to reinvent the entire agreement or the project for that and Skullcandy.

"The development agreement has the flexibility in it to resolve these issues and therefore we don’t see any reason to really divert from that," Peck said. "At the end of the day we are under contract, but I understand their motives to get the best deal possible."

The project is tentatively scheduled for a discussion and possible recommendation on Tuesday, March 22.

"I am expecting some comprises to have been reached and if they haven’t we will just keep scheduling it. I think it is our job as a commission to keep vetting and working hard at these agreements," Peck said. "Even though it is going to the county manager for a decision, we are going to make sure we have done as much foundational work as we can so that essentially the decision is easy. We have to get it right."

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