KAC design belongs in another country

Editor:

I would like to extend a Tonight Show Thank You Card to The Park Record (think of the music with it). Thank you Park Record for having a front page article titled" Kimball Design is Praised," only to have quoted one person who likes the new design. Great journalism. The person who is quoted is a longtime resident since 1994. He says the design is modern and in keeping with mining tradition (like hydraulic fracking?) and would be a focal point along Main Street.

As someone who has owned a historic miners home for over 30 yrs, I have been told what I can and cannot do with the property. I have seen the guidelines changed many times in those years. I have not changed my property have had many ribbons placed on it by the town. I have also been to several planning meeting, listening to owners jump thru hoops to make their historic homes a little more livable while being within the guidelines.

Historic Main Street is like no other place in town or the Basin. When you walk it you feel the history of over a century of people walking these sidewalks. There is no focal point, the whole street is the focal point. When I look at the new design I cannot imagine anything that relates to the history of this town.

If you did a survey and asked people who did they think designed this: a: local architects experienced in historic American mining town design or b: a renowned Danish architectural firm.


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I feel there would be few answering a. This thing screams Scandinavian.

The Kimball blew it by choosing a Danish firm. They just don't get it. I understand art galleries like to make a statement with their buildings drawing attention to it, but not at the base of our historic main street.

No exceptions even for art centers.

Russ Paskoski

Park City

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State legislative process is seriously flawed

Editor,

The Salt Lake Tribune article "Legislative Session Stats Revealing" that ran recently in The Record was discouraging. Of the total 486 bills passed, 57% passed in the last week of a 45-day session and a third passed on the final day. This most definitely raises the question if many were meaningfully scrutinized, debated and negotiated prior to passage.

What intensifies my concern is that the Utah legislature allows members to submit a Request for Legislation "secretly," in that the request is made but does not receive a number and is not publicized until the sponsor says so. Neither the public nor other legislators, except the sponsor's inner circle, are aware of the proposed bill and cannot start researching or reacting to it until perhaps months later. Therefore, even if a bill is discussed in committee meetings prior to a vote, valuable time is lost and the sponsors have an often insurmountable advantage over those who are undecided or opposed.

That many in the legislature accept delays and last minute consideration as business as usual or "the nature of the organization" is an insult to constituents. Elected officials should hold themselves to a higher standard when it comes to decision-making that determines the well-being of the people and state of Utah. Sadly, I am certain this behavior is a result of strategy and not simply human nature.

Steve Spaulding

Park City

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Record's PCMR/Talisker coverage is biased

Editor:

I read with interest your article in the Park Record, under the heading "Vail makes a buyout offer" and its deck head, "PCMR won't agree to a takeover by the Colorado firm."

The article goes on to précis the open letter from Vail CEO Rob Katz in a way I feel lends bias to PCMR's position. Haven't people had enough of the Big Bad Vail thread uninformed people are still clinging to?

It appears PCMR by their own admission forgot to send the required written notification to Talisker on time and in line with the terms of their lease. PCMR started the legal action and, according to reports in your paper, backdated a letter to suggest they had in fact complied with the terms of the lease on time. How that comprises open and honest business practice is beyond me.

Your paper prides itself on serving the community for 140 years and if that is the case a more balanced reporting of this vital dispute would be welcomed.

You seem to print every utterance the Cummings/PCMR camp puts forward promoting their view of interstate tyranny and wrongfulness. The irrelevant flow charts provided by PCMR and taking up more space on the front page of this issue than the Katz article would seem to support this and yet such an insightful and vital letter written in open forum by Vail's CEO Rob Katz is only disseminated in an article and put on your website instead of being printed in your paper in its entirety to provide the more balanced approach the community deserves.

Andrew Morphett

Park City