Letters to the Editor, April 22-25, 2017 | ParkRecord.com
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Letters to the Editor, April 22-25, 2017

Submissions from Park Record Readers

Student offers a new transportation plan

Editor:

I think we need public transportation. I know that we have a bus and it pretty much takes you everywhere in Park City. But it's just too slow.

The public transportation I think we need is a train. I was brainstorming and if you start it at the Jeremy Ranch Park-n-ride and put it going along the road; it goes under the highway and goes to Redstone and stops to pick up people there. Then it goes to the Parley's Park Elementary area and stops to pick up people. Then goes to Canyons to drop anyone off there that wants to go skiing. Then it goes into town to Park City Mountain Resort. Everyone gets off there and uses the buses to get wherever they want from there.

It might cost a lot of money, but I believe it will be completely worth it. It will be great for the rapidly growing city that we live in.

Ryan Jeffrey
Park City student

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Late Jazz festival founder deserves accolades

Editor:

Park City owes a debt of gratitude to Lew Fine, who recently died, at the age of 90, for his prominent involvement in community service organizations. But especially as inspiration and principal creator of the Park City International Jazz Festival, a singularly popular summer event that, during its existence, attracted not only star-quality musicians, but remarkably large, enthusiastically entertained audiences.
A jazz epicure, Lew, after establishing himself and his family here, increasingly foresaw Park City’s potential for duplicating festivals that had earned celebrated repute around this country showcasing and consequently preserving America’s own music. Resolved finally, having tested the idea with others, that the concept had a chance, he tirelessly initiated contacts, enterprised sponsorships, designed program ideas, enlisting encouragement all the while. And at its dawning, the Park City festival, centered at Deer Valley’s outdoor amphitheater, became triumphant, an annual spectator magnate until the 2008 Great Recession discouraged sponsors, precipitating its demise.

But the influence lives on. As with equivalent attention-capturing spectacles — 2002 Winter Olympics events, Sundance Film Festival, Miners’ Day celebration, also the recently revived Autumn Aloft hot air balloon festival — the Park City International Jazz Festival significantly helped foster this town’s now widely known reputation as a location where both residing and visiting co-exist in mutually shared appreciation, a stunning recovery from its once forlorn abandonment.

A visionary in community leadership, Lew Fine deserves grateful recognition for devoting his time, labor and talents to amplified restoration of a robust Park City vitality, cultural as well as material.

Harry E. Fuller Jr.
Park City