Letters to the editor, Nov.20-22, 2013 | ParkRecord.com

Letters to the editor, Nov.20-22, 2013

Submissions from Park Record readers

Treasure Mountain students thank support staff

Editor:

Here at Treasure Mountain, there are many hard-working staff members that constantly working to help the TMJH students. We have an amazing staff that is not recognized as often as they should be.

For example, we have an amazing tech support staff member, Ms. Gallagher, that helps us with any computer problem we have. She will fix your wifi, help clean your computer, and repair damages; she solves every problem imaginable on our computers.

Also, we are lucky to have the custodial team that has to deal with cleaning up after messy junior high students. The custodial team is very interactive with students, and knows most of us by name.

We are also lucky to have great cooking staff that are able to manage to cook breakfast and lunch for hundreds of students every day. They make wonderful food that is appreciated by all of the TMJH students.

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Our school office staff is amazing at handling student absences, and keeping students organized. They have so much to deal with each day, and they manage to keep everything under control.

Without these wonderful people, our school would fall apart because they do so much for us to keep it the best school possible. On November 20, thanks to the Governor Herbert, we can express our appreciation to these wonderful staff members. They are the glue that keeps this school together, and we are so lucky to have all of them here at Treasure Mountain Junior High.

Sage Roberts and Anna Deimling

Park City

Alexie storm blown out of proportion

Editor:

I want to thank Kathy De Temple (our family has never met her) who supported my daughter’s position regarding "Hurricane Alexie" which stormed through Park City High School recently, and may I say it never even reached a ‘Category One’ status as some parents would have you believe. And yes, my Cameron is a young lady and not a boy as you assumed but the name is very androgynous. No worries.

What’s more important is the fact that Cameron and many of her classmates—some who wrote letters supporting Mr. Alexie to the Park Record— hopefully managed to remind parents that "over parenting" is not a virtue and perhaps some deep breathing exercises for a few minutes may be the recipe to take in the future when your child is exposed to sexual overtones and sexual connotations in the classroom. You might even want to follow your child around school one day and experience their life first hand—you may learn some new dirty words, faint when you see how some of them dress, and become comatose when you see how they interact and speak to one another. In short, you’ll find out that they know more than you do when it comes to the subject of SEX. Sorry to burst your bubble.

I do, however, respect those who dove their "heads into the sand" and pleaded guilty to "how could you have that man in our school with my child" syndrome. You have that right to an opinion. Ironically though, at the end of the day, I bet behind closed doors your child was embarrassed by your reaction.

My suggestion to those "anti-alexie" parents would be to loosen the reins a little on these highly educated, highly motivated, and highly broad-minded young adults who proudly attend Park City High School today. Otherwise, when they come home from their first year away from you, they may implode right in front of your eyes because they found out the real world is much different than what you taught them in your own living room.

Sincerely,

Philip Perry

Cameron’s Dad

Park City needs to expand fiber optics

Editor:

As a small business owner in Park City that directly relies on the internet being fast and reliable:

The idea of broadband to all homes and business in Park City is a good one. The issues here are who provides the actual physical link, and what do we get for the money invested. Once Park City establishes or subsidizes such a service it will be locked-in for years to come and will in effect exclude all others.

If the provider ends up being Comcast (Xfinity) provided by cable TV technology then the service will be slow, intermittent, and have very poor service. The danger here is that Comcast has huge resources and money and can in effect buy their way in as the provider. They can also parade ‘experts’ by the dozen past the city council. Unfortunately cable TV being used for internet connectivity is a fundamentally flawed technology. It was never designed for bi-directional communication.

If Century Link (Fiber, then DSL over the existing copper phone lines for the last mile) is chosen as the service, it will be fast and fairly reliable. Having the last mile be copper wire and phone lines is faster than cable TV, but still is not state-of-the-art. (It is also what I currently am using to my business and home.)

There are other solutions such as wireless broadband and such, none of which are any real step forward in technology.

The only technology that actually represents an advance forward is laying in actual fiber optics as the last mile to houses and businesses. It is also the most expensive approach, and far faster than any other approach. This approach requires actually digging trenches and laying in new ‘wires and cables’.

If the Park City government is to have an actual positive effect on the business environment and economic health of the area the only approach that has adds value is the last one, to lay in fiber optics for the last mile. Google Fiber is apparently planning to do this in the near future. Teaming up with and subsidizing Google fiber would be the most cost-effective approach. An alternative, and most expensive approach, is for Park City to lay the fiber and then let ISPs use it for the last mile.

Richard Keene, Sandswept Studios

Park City

Homeowner says housing seasonal employees has been fun

Editor:

I am writing in agreement with the editorial essay, Nov. 16-19, 2013, "Try opening your home to a seasonal employee". This will be our sixth winter to welcome one into our modest home. We are looking forward to this week’s arrival of a young teacher from Australia.

Over the years we have worked with the Christian Center and posted fliers with the local ski resorts. We charge a lower rate than average based on looking at ads myself. In return we advertise for a "cat lover" who will enjoy our two kitties day-to-day and care for them if we are away. Both parties get a good deal.

We use a basic rental agreement that may be obtained with an online search. The only times we have been even minorly stiffed was by Americans! Now the rule is "No money, no key". We have enjoyed the company of two young men from Peru. One was from a wealthy family but took his job as a waiter very seriously. His mother was a pastry chef. Any day there might be a fabulous dessert on the counter. Another, from South Africa, stayed two winters and a summer. He recorded a CD in his room! One was a chef who left dinner for us simmering on the stove as he did artwork in the garage. I learned some chefs think they don’t have to do dishes and clean up the kitchen!

As with any people, a little tolerance is needed from both sides. Some need guidance and explanation of local laws and customs. Some come in and go out so quickly we barely see them. Others hang out at the kitchen table like the kids we don’t have. We are "Facebook" friends with the last three renters. They remain part of our lives.

If you have considered this and have the space I, like the Editor, encourage you to give it a try.

Becky Yih

Park City

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