Providing hope at home and abroad | ParkRecord.com

Providing hope at home and abroad

Amy Roberts, Park Record columnist

This weekend I caught up with an old friend who was in town for a ski trip. He asked what I’ve been up to in the last few weeks, and I started rambling about all of my extracurricular activities.

I told him I’d been at several of the Red, White and Snow events for the National Abilities Center the nights prior. Which didn’t come as a surprise to him considering I smelled like a vineyard. I mentioned this coming weekend I have the Saints and Sinners fundraiser for the Park City Institute, and will probably consume just as much wine at that event. I told him about the various board meetings I have this week for a variety of nonprofits I’m involved with. And then there’s a breakfast fundraiser at the end of the month I’m helping to organize for The Hope Alliance. "That takes care of my March of events," I told him when I’d finished going through my calendar.

This friend works in LA in the entertainment business. He easily puts in 70 or more hours a week. As I continued telling him about all the fundraisers in town, he looked at me and said, "There’s not that much going on in LA. How does this little town put on so many events?"

This is a guy who covers the Emmys, the Golden Globes and the Oscars, so I can only assume his tolerance for glitzy parties and hobnobbing is already unreasonably high.

I shrugged my shoulders and replied. "In Park City, there’s always a parade and costumes and galas and themed parties and fundraisers and road closures and special events. That’s how we roll."

An explanation he found curious at best.

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"I barely have time to write a check for my kids’ dance lessons and soccer league, let alone go to a recital or a game," he said. "How do people in this town make time to go to all these events?"

A question I had to pause on before answering. I’ve never really felt like I had to make time for anything, it’s just built into our week, in the same way that eating dinner or walking the dog are.

"Park City is a town that requires participation," I finally answered. "We don’t go home after work and crash in front of the TV. We spend that time hiking with friends and neighbors and colleagues and inviting them to be part of something we’re already involved with."

Which led to another question from him. "So which cause do you care about most?"

But that time, I didn’t have to pause on my answer. "The Hope Alliance," I told him.

There are dozens, if not hundreds, of worthy charities in Park City. They all do amazing work and make our town healthier, happier, more educated, more informed and overall, make Park City a better place to live.

But The Hope Alliance holds a special place in my heart.

In a nutshell, The Hope Alliance does what it can to make the world a better place for those who need it most.

Whether it’s a dental clinic in Peru; vocational training in Guatemala; a medical mission in Mexico; a clean water project in Haiti; or working with the People’s Health Clinic to give free glasses and eye exams to our local workforce who can’t afford it, The Hope Alliance changes lives both here at home and around the globe.

And while there is no shortage of worthy causes or fundraisers to support in this town, this is the one I personally hold dearest. If you’d like to learn more about The Hope Alliance or register to attend the upcoming "Abundance of Hope" breakfast fundraiser on March 24, please visit: http://www.TheHopeAlliance.org .

It’s a cause worth getting out of bed for.

Amy Roberts is a freelance writer, longtime Park City resident, and the proud owner of two rescued Dalmatians, Stanley and Willis.

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