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Eight cement memorial walls have been built at Park City Cemetery with space for people to be remembered locally even if they are buried elsewhere. Park City is selling space on the walls to qualifying people. Christopher Reeves/Park City

Many Parkites uprooted themselves from their families and their hometowns to move to Park City.

Some have made arrangements to be buried in the community they came from instead of Park City. But they want their time in Park City marked in some fashion.

Park City has built a set of eight cement walls inside Park City Cemetery off Kearns Boulevard that will be used as a memorial for people who lived in the city but are buried elsewhere. The hulking walls, named in honor of historic Park City mines, have been highly visible from Kearns Boulevard since the installation started last fall.

City Hall is selling space on the walls to people who qualify. A space will cost $250. Someone must also purchase their own plaque either six inches by six inches or five inches by eight inches -- to be placed on the wall. It is recommended that the plaques be made of bronze.

The Park City Recreation Department is able to provide information about firms that could be used to make a plaque or someone may choose their own. The Recreation Department estimates a plaque could cost between $160 and $275 to make.

Karen Yocum, the recreation supervisor, said she anticipates the first plaques will be installed in May. She said there has been limited interest, but the memorial walls have not been widely publicized. There is space for 334 plaques between the walls.

Someone must be deemed eligible to purchase a space based on the connection to Park City. They must meet at least one requirement from a list that has been developed.

They include:

  • being a Park City resident

  • being a non-Parkite but a Park City resident for at least 10 consecutive years at an earlier point

  • being born in Park City

  • owning property in Park City

    Pets will not be allowed to be remembered on the walls.

    Park City Councilwoman Liza Simpson, who monitors the work of the Recreation Advisory Board on behalf of the elected officials, said the panel wanted the walls located in a place that is easily accessible for pedestrians and the disabled.

    Simpson said the walls will serve as remembrances for Parkites buried elsewhere. She also said they could honor the lives of people who are cremated.

    "There's an awful lot of people choosing not to be buried anymore," she said.

    People who are interested in purchasing space on the walls may contact Yocum. Her phone number is 615-5413 and her e-mail address is karen@parkcity.org.