The Park City Film Studios construction is easily seen from vantages at Quinn’s Junction. The studio complex is one of two large construction
The Park City Film Studios construction is easily seen from vantages at Quinn's Junction. The studio complex is one of two large construction projects at the U.S. 40-S.R. 248 interchange. The other is the Park City Heights housing development. Christopher Reeves/Park Record

Park City's biggest concentration of construction is located in one of the city's most visible spots.

Drivers along S.R. 248 and U.S. 40 close to Quinn's Junction have nearly windshield-filling views of two major construction zones situated in close proximity to one another.

The work stretches out from the southwest corner of Quinn's Junction. Heavy machinery moving dirt and, more recently, vertical construction is easily visible.

One of the projects is the Park City Film Studios, a complex that is slated to eventually house a movie-studio complex, a hotel, an entertainment center, international film school and digital media center. The studio complex construction site is closest to S.R. 248. The other project is Park City Heights, a residential development by Ivory Homes with a mix of work force housing and market-rate units.

Construction at the studio complex site this year will include a building housing production facilities and soundstages.

Chad Root, the building official at City Hall, said the crews have spent time building an earthen berm paralleling S.R. 248. The berm will later be reduced in size and landscaping will be planted.

"They seem to be doing really well as far as their timeframes," Root said.

Root said the crews are also continuing to build a driveway from S.R. 248 into the project. The road will intersect S.R. 248 at the location of a stoplight across the state highway from the entry road to the Park City Medical Center. Root said the signal heads of the stoplight will be replaced to better manage the traffic flow at the intersection.

At Park City Heights, Root said, the developers are installing water lines and removing contaminated soils from the site. Vertical construction has not started at Park City Heights. Root said the Park City Heights developers want to start to build 10 residential units this year. Construction will increase at the site in 2015, he said.

Two of the area’s largest construction zones are at Quinn’s Junction. Some of the work is highly visible to drivers along the S.R. 248 entryway
Two of the area's largest construction zones are at Quinn's Junction. Some of the work is highly visible to drivers along the S.R. 248 entryway and on U.S. 40. Christopher Reeves/Park Record

Root said the Building Department received complaints about the amount of dust kicked up at each of the sites. The complaints have come from people at the Quinn's Junction recreation complex across S.R. 248. Root said the Building Department has requested the construction crews water down the dirt in an effort to reduce the dust.

Root said 2014 is the first of four consecutive years of anticipated heavy construction at the two sites.

"They're pretty good sized," he said.

The Park City construction industry is enjoying a strong year in 2014 as builders continue to shake off the recession. A permit for work on the Park City Film Studios, issued in May, further propped up the numbers.

Park City leaders for years have carefully attempted to guide development at Quinn's Junction, saying they did not want that intersection to one day resemble the heavily commercial Kimball Junction.

There was resistance at City Hall to the development of the Park City Film Studios before officials and the developer reached an agreement to annex the land into Park City. Some leaders even then opposed the project as not fitting along the entryway.

Park City, meanwhile, at one point became financially involved in Park City Heights as a means to influence the designs. The mix of work force units and market-rate places was a result of City Hall's involvement. The project will have more work force units than it would have if City Hall had not been a part of Park City Heights.