Parkite Bryce Johnson is crazy busy.

He's a guitarist and has toured the West from Arizona all the way up to Alaska. He also has written commercial scores and compositions for Disney, NBC, Coca-Cola and "Nashville Star's" Charley Jenkins, to name a few, and he's a fashion photographer and owner of a fashion website, www.hauteattitude.com .

Johnson is also a videographer and shot the video for Utah-based singer Alex Boye's version of "Let It Go," which was filmed at the Midway Ice Castles last winter.

The song was the featured hit in Disney's animated film, "Frozen," and the video, to date, has garnered more than 31 million views.

Johnson said all these twists in his career have come naturally, but also out of necessity.

"I started my career as a musician playing in bands," Johnson said during an interview with The Park Record. "After doing that for a few years, I knew I had to take it a little further, rather than just doing the club circuit."

So Johnson, who has lived in Park City for just a little more than a decade, got a job at a recording studio in Los Angeles and worked his way up to chief mixer and engineer.

"The studio happened to specialize in big, national commercials," Johnson said. "We did things for Nike and Coca-Cola and when we did the mixes, the directors would come in and I would ask them how they got this shot and that shot, because even when I was doing music, I was interested in the visual side of things."

Johnson began filming video and throughout the past few years, the video projects became busier than the music projects.

During the video shoots, he would take stills with his video camera.

"For some reason, I started shooting photos and my obsession with fashion photography rose to the top because, I think, it was really creative," he said. "I love the lighting and the experimentation you get to do with the photography."

Although Johnson still works in all three mediums, his video skills have been on demand for quite a while, but regardless, he has found all of these artistic outlets complement each other.

"I can relate to the musicians when I do music videos, because I was a guitar player and played in a bar band called Reflex and traveled the circuit," he said. "My wife, Laura, was the lead singer of the band and we traveled a lot. We stayed in a little city for a week and then moved on to the next."

Photography feels musical to Johnson.

"When you create music, it feels similar to creating a visual image," he said.

Johnson began working with Boye on music videos a year and a half ago.

"He found me by doing a music search on YouTube," Johnson said. "He was interested in shooting a dance video for his wife.

"I did one and tagged it with some dance keywords," Johnson explained. "He found it, liked it and emailed me. I shot a video for him and have shot seven or eight for him since."

Johnson, who is also a father of two, likes working with Boye because of the singer's organizational skills.

"He knew what he was doing and he chooses his songs to cover with a purpose," he said.

Although his business ebbs and flows with the economy, because Johnson is so diversified, he always manages to keep busy.

"I mean, my music took a hit three years ago, but that allowed me to jump into the fashion photographer," he said. "I had a ton of time, unfortunately, and started shooting a ton of photos."

The reward for this sort of lifestyle is that Johnson gets to do different things.

"I work crazy hours and am up usually until 4 a.m., trying to finish something that I shot during the day," he said. "I've been shooting for local clothing designers and shot for local models who were building their portfolios."

That's what spurred him to open www.hauteattitude.com .

"I spent quite a bit of time of my life promoting other people's things, so I figured what I should do is dive into retail and promote my own company," Johnson said. "Fashion seemed to make sense because I'm a fashion photographer."

Although it would have made sense to stay in Los Angeles or Nashville, Tenn., because of his music background, Johnson moved to Park City for a simple reason — his wife.

"Her parents live here," he said. "And there was skiing. We both looked into other resort towns, because I always pictured myself living in one and Park City won out. It was the obvious choice."

For more information about Bryce Johnson, visit brycejohnsonvisuals.com.