From left, Luke Martin, PGA professional at Promontory, Vaughn Robinson, golf pro at Park City Golf Course and Cynthia Brown, LPGA pro at Park City Golf
From left, Luke Martin, PGA professional at Promontory, Vaughn Robinson, golf pro at Park City Golf Course and Cynthia Brown, LPGA pro at Park City Golf Course, pose for a picture after playing 100 holes of golf to raise money for breast cancer research last year. (Photo courtesy of Cynthia Brown)

On Wednesday, July 16, a few Park City golf professionals will take to the links at Promontory to play 100 holes of golf.

Starting at 5 a.m., the group, consisting of Luke Martin of Promontory, Vaughn Robinson and Cynthia Brown of Park City Golf Course and Jake Hanley of Jeremy Ranch will play until all the holes are completed, switching between Promontory's Pete Dye course and the Jack Nicklaus-designed Painted Valley course.

Brown, the LGPA professional at Park City Golf Course and executive director of The Playing For Life Foundation, said this is just the start of this year's fundraising efforts.

"This will be our fifth year we do the 100 holes," she said. "We do the 100 holes tomorrow and then, in August, we'll do a golf tournament, silent auction and gala at Riverhorse."

All the money raised will be divided among three breast cancer-related initiatives, Brown added.

"Last year, we were able to offer 75 free mammograms in the Park City area through a partnership with the People's Health Clinic," she said. "We also help fund breast cancer research with Huntsman [Cancer Institute of Utah] and we were able to offer eight retreats for stage four and general breast cancer survivors through Image Reborn."

These efforts are made with one goal in mind, Brown said.

"It's for a great cause," she said. "We're trying to cure breast cancer in our lifetime."

The 100 holes challenge tests the pros' mental states, as well as their physical well-being.


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"In the dark we'll tee off, and then we'll finish in the dark," Brown said, adding that it took the group 14 hours and 16 minutes to complete 100 holes last year. "It's really more mental than anything. You have to make sure you don't step funny and hurt something and you have to keep your mind to stay in the game."

Staying in the game and playing well is important, Brown added, pointing out that groups will donate more money for lower scores.

"We have a whole lot of sponsors who donate a certain amount for eagles, birdies and pars," she said. "So every shot is done with precision and we're trying to get the lowest scores to raise as much money as possible."

For more information on The Playing For Life Foundation or the 100 Holes of Golf fundraiser, visit www.theplayingforlifefoundation.org .