Schow wins Junior Worlds Qualifier | ParkRecord.com

Schow wins Junior Worlds Qualifier

As Mitchell Schow approached the 18th green at Park Meadows Country Club on Friday afternoon, he was trying to stop his slide and hold on to the top position at the Junior World qualifying tournament.

After shooting 67s in both of his first two rounds (at the Riverbend and Meadow Brook golf courses), Schow approached the green with a score of 73 for Friday’s round, and he still needed to finish off the last hole.

"I started to fall apart," he said. "I played good except for the back nine."

The Park City High School golfer, coming off a freshman year that saw him finish fifth in the 3A state tournament, polished off the round with a two-putt, earning a score of 75 for the round.

That would prove to be just enough to win the title, edging out Austin Banz for first place in the field of more than 80 golfers ages 15-17. Schow’s three-round score of 209 bested Banz’s total of 211.

Playing in front of scouts from the University of Utah and Utah Valley University, Schow said he didn’t change his approach at all.

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"I’m used to playing in front of them at all the major tournaments," he said. "So it really doesn’t bother me."

Instead, he simply focused on trying to outplay the two other members of his group. He said playing at Park Meadows was a good way to end the week.

"It’s in good shape," he said. "It’s a nice course to end on."

And the home course advantage never hurts, the Parkite added.

"It was nice to play here," he said. "I got to sleep in a little longer."

Now, the junior golfer will head to San Diego for the Junior World Championships. He’ll compete against the world’s best 15- to 17-year-old golfers July 15-19 at Torrey Pines.

He and Banz, along with two other qualifiers from the Utah Junior Golf Association, will represent the state at the finals.

To be competitive at the event, Schow said he’s going to need to work on a part of his game nearly all golfers strive to improve.

"I’m going to have to work on my putting a little bit more," he said.

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