Farasha boutique owner and stylist Vanessa Di Palma Wright houses designs by artists from all over the world, including designers from Utah. Christopher
Farasha boutique owner and stylist Vanessa Di Palma Wright houses designs by artists from all over the world, including designers from Utah. Christopher Reeves/Park Record.
Vanessa Di Palma Wright started her business in fashion during the economic recession in 2009, a tough time for boutiques and retail in general. However, her business is not typical. Wright put a new spin on the concept and started Farasha, what she describes as a public relations agency for emerging global designers.

The focus is to create temporary store fronts and pop-up boutiques in strategic locations throughout the United States that showcase up-and-coming designers from across the globe. After being a pop-up boutique at the St. Regis Deer Valley for two years, Wright has opened a full-time storefront on Main Street.

"We represent around 50 designers, and they are basically all starting out from all over the world, including local Utah designers," Wright said. "We like to either rotate the designers or the entire inventory every two months. We always try to think outside the box and keep the store fresh, more of a showroom concept."

Rotten Banana from France, Okay Coky from Spain, Chako from Japan and Zoe Zoberski from Utah are several designers currently being showcased in the store. While these names are not well-known, Wright said that is what she loves about them. She said she is glad to have a place that is able to introduce newfound designers to clientele who appreciate it and want something unique.

The Parisian boutique-like store on Main has white walls and very few decorations, because Wright said the goal is to let the inventory do the talking. The global style of the clothing, jewelry and handbags in the store is loud in both color and texture, a bit different from Wright's personal style, which she said is classic and elegant.

The clothing currently on display is elegant itself, but in a more "jet-setting" way, Wright said. Fur coats, orange moto-jackets, snakeskin purses and silver and gold jewelry are displayed throughout the boutique, and French music plays over the loudspeakers.

The store is inspired by one of Wright's favorite cities when it comes to fashion: Paris. Istanbul is currently her favorite city, and she said she was somewhat surprised to find amazing talent and designers in what she thought would be a very conservative country. She is also inspired by her home country of Uruguay.

"When I started, I specifically went and spent a couple of days in the capital of Uruguay to try and find some designers," Wright said. "One of the designers, Cuca Regueira, I have been working with since the start of the company, and she has been wonderful. South America has a lot of talent."

Wright's husband is from Utah, so the company is based in Park City where they live full-time. When they are not traveling the world, Wright said she is making calls to try and showcase different designers. She has found that Utah can be a tough sell but thinks that people underestimate the talent that can be found here.

It isn't until she tells people that Park City is home to the Sundance Film Festival that they come around, she said, and although she wishes Utah were recognized on its own without the festival, she is grateful to offer an outlet for those in the state that cherish novel designs.

"We did a pop-up in New York City when I first started, but New York is so infiltrated with boutiques and there is so much going on that it is hard to compete," Wright said. "In a resort town like Park City, there is that demographic that appreciates it and is looking for something different."

Farasha also hosts ongoing events that are detailed on the official website, and Wright said they are currently planning a beauty event for Valentine's Day as well as an event in partnership with the American Heart Association for National Wear Red Day, on Feb. 7.

"The main focus of Farasha, though, is establishing pop-up boutiques on a national scale and eventually internationally," Wright said. "We like to represent emerging designers from different countries, but we do represent local talent and hope to continue to do so."

Farasha

  • 605 Main St.
  • 435-649-3123
  • www.farashastyle.com
  • Monday Saturday: 10 a.m. until 9 p.m.
  • Sunday: 11 a.m. until 7 p.m.