Shades of Pale Brewing Company announced Saturday plans to move its manufacturing facilities from its Park City location on Munchkin Road, pictured here,
Shades of Pale Brewing Company announced Saturday plans to move its manufacturing facilities from its Park City location on Munchkin Road, pictured here, to Salt Lake City. (Alan Maguire/Park Record)

Shades of Pale Brewing Company announced Saturday plans to move its manufacturing facilities from Park City to Salt Lake City.

"We've been looking for the last couple years to try and remain in Park City and haven't been successful in really locating a place where we can continue to grow and expand without putting a lot of money into infrastructure," Shades of Pale founder and sole full-time employee, Trent Fargher told The Park Record.

Fargher said that zoning in the Park City area drastically limits options for a newer facility. The company, which has been making beer in Park City since it opened in 2010, explored locations in the Bonanza Park area, as well as in the Silver Summit area near Home Depot.

"Right now, we're 1,200, 1,300 square feet for our operation, and we outgrew that basically six months after we were here," Fargher said. "And in looking at what we wanted to move into, we wanted to be somewhere between 10,000 and 12,000 square feet to start with, with the ability to expand beyond that as needed.

"The infrastructure to put in a facility like this is very expensive and it's costly to continually move, so we'd rather get into a larger space and grow into it, and then have the ability to expand around it, and there just isn't that ability here in the Park City area."

The Salt Lake City facility will be located on S. West Temple just south of 2100 South.


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When it moves to the new locale, which will include a tap room, a gift shop, and art gallery, Shades of Pale will begin manufacturing full-strength beers for the first time.

The company would like to open a smaller facility in Park City, but Utah's liquor laws forbid full-strength beers from being served from kegs, and that is currently a sticking point for the company.

"It would be more like a nano-type setup where we're doing recipe development, and we're getting direct feedback from customers over the counter. But in order for that to happen some laws need to change," Fargher said.

"To serve beer that's higher than four percent [alcohol by volume], at this point you have to put it in some sort of bottle, can or package. Well that's not real conducive to setting up a pilot system to be able to do feedback where I can't serve it," he said. "I can make it, but they can't drink it."

Fargher said that a bottling line can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and take up significant space.

"I don't know, it's one of these ludicrous laws that we have on the books that just makes absolutely no sense."

The company will be moving to the new facility beginning in July, and expects it to be a process lasting around a month.

"We're excited to move, we're excited to expand our offerings," Fargher said. "It's all we can do to keep up with the four styles we're making. But we have a lot of other styles under wraps at this point that we've been playing around with and experimenting with. There will be some good stuff to come from Shades of Pale for sure."