Several external designs of a building to be constructed on Kearns Boulevard to house the Park City Center for Advanced Professional Studies were presented
Several external designs of a building to be constructed on Kearns Boulevard to house the Park City Center for Advanced Professional Studies were presented to the Park City School District Board of Education at last week s meeting. Image courtesy of VCBO Architecture.
The Park City Center for Advanced Professional Studies will soon be wrapping up its first school year, and in just eight months, it has generated innovative projects for several big-name companies like Adobe, RAMP Sports and Hill Air Force Base. However, this big program is being housed in small quarters.

The Park City School District Board of Education has been reviewing plans for a PCCAPS building for at least two years, according to PCSD business administrator Todd Hauber. Finally, at last week's school board meeting, representatives from VCBO Architecture out of Salt Lake City presented plans for the external design of the building proposed sto be built on Kearns Boulevard adjacent to the Park City Learning Center.

"The Master Planning Committee for the building is now acting like a design committee, putting together a design for the building that can then be presented to the board for approval of the project," he said. "They are putting all the details together for an actual proposal for the board to work with."

Hauber said he is hoping and expecting a full proposal to be presented to the school board at the next regular session on May 20.

The plans for the building will not only include internal and external design plans but also the finalized costs of the project. Right now, the construction costs are estimated at $4 million with furniture, fixtures and equipment costing another $1 million, Hauber said.

"The estimated cost of the project is something in the $5 million range, but with more detailed information, we'll have a better idea of what exactly it will cost," he added. "We still haven't estimated what the construction materials or internal construction design will cost, so those are some items that still need to be worked out, which can change the costs up or down."

There are four different funds within the PCSD budget, and he said there are currently sufficient funds in the capital fund to cover the costs of the project.

The internal design of the building has yet to be finalized, but representatives of VCBO Architecture said they want to keep the  open design  housed at
The internal design of the building has yet to be finalized, but representatives of VCBO Architecture said they want to keep the open design housed at the PCCAPS center currently off Sidewinder Drive. Image courtesy of VCBO Architecture.
The general fund covers operating costs, salaries, bonuses, classroom expenses and utilities, and there is a specific levy that provides revenue stream to the fund.

The capital local levy generates revenue to cover the costs of building projects, construction, remodels and improvements, and that is where the $5 million for the PCCAPS building will come from. Hauber said the capital fund is a separate fund not related to the general fund and separately managed by the school board.

Representatives of VCBO said at last week's school board meeting that if the plans for the building are approved as soon as possible, construction on the building could be completed for an August 2015 move-in date.

The location of the building will be "west and south of Treasure Mountain Junior High School where the Park City Learning Center is." That is the site that has been selected and recommended by the Master Planning Committee, according to VCBO representatives.

The discussed plans include a two-level building with solar panels to create a "limited footprint," pedestrian access from the tunnel and sidewalk and vehicular access from Kearns Boulevard and Comstock Drive.

Hauber said when he first began working for the district in May 2012, the Master Planning Committee had already concluded prioritization of the projects that the district was to move forward on, and one of them was the PCCAPS building.

He then learned there were Master Plan documents adopted by the school board in 2010 for a Career and Technical Education (CTE) building, but a building for the PCCAPS program would be much more beneficial due to what he called a more robust and aggressive program than CTE ever was.

"My hope would be that by the school board meeting to be held at the end of May, there will be either an up or down decision by the board to move forward [with the project] or not," Hauber said.