To celebrate America Recycles Day this Thursday, Nov. 15, Recycle Utah is holding an open house from 9 to 11 a.m. at their building materials reuse store, located at 1951 Woodbine Way in Park City.

"We have two great things going on," Recycle Utah Executive Director Insa Riepen said. "We'll have coffee and bagels in the morning, and then an open house for our newly refurbished, reorganized, restructured building materials warehouse. So you can have coffee and a bagel, and go shopping."

The warehouse accepts and re-sells everything from two-by-fours to washing machines.

"Repurposing and reusing is always more exciting and better than recycling," Riepen said. "So it's a good time for you to go through your garage. If you have a couple two-by-fours that have been sitting in the back of the garage to wait for a project, now is the time to get rid of them, because you aren't doing the project anyway. You might as well bring them here."

Others then have a chance to purchase the items at a discount instead of a big box store, Riepen said. "It is incredibly important for us to keep the material out of our landfill. That's the idea behind the warehouse."

There is currently a waiting list for washers and dryers. Cabinets are also in high demand.

"We also take plumbing and working sinks," Riepen said. "Right now we have 25 toilets sitting here. A toilet breaks and they come here and buy one for $15. It's a whole lot better than paying $150 at Home Depot."

A lot of people also bring in hollow white six-panel doors when they are redoing the interior of their home, she said.

"Someone who has brown hollow doors would be thrilled to have the white six panel doors," Riepen said. "That would be an improvement for them. With this kind of change out, none of these doors need to end up in a landfill."

Recycle Utah is also offering free electronic waste drop-off from 8 to 5:30 p.m. the same day. Normally, dropping off a monitor to recycle costs $5 and dropping off a television costs between $5 and $15, depending on the size.

"We need to pay for it by the pound, so if you have a 52-inch monster television that weighs 500 pounds, you can imagine our cost to get that recycled," Riepen said.