Snyderville Basin Special Recreation District will present the Summit County Council with a proposal to add a $25 million bond to the November ballot at the Council's weekly meeting on Wednesday, July 30.

The meeting will be held at the Sheldon Richins building at Kimball Junction, with the work session commencing at 3:30 p.m. and public input beginning at 6 p.m.

Rena Jordan, district director, said the bond will be used for open space acquisition, expanding recreation facilities and activities, and maintenance and development of trails. The $25 million is broken down into two parts: $15 for open space, and $10 million for recreation and trail projects.

The $10 million for recreation projects includes $2 million for trails, $5.5 million for the final phase of the Fieldhouse construction, and a $2.5 million contribution for a potential expansion of the Park City Ice Arena.

The district's last bond election was in 2010 when 72 percent of voters approved a $20 million open space and trails bond. (A simple majority is required.) Basin Recreation used $12 million for open space preservation, and $8 million was used on trail development projects, including planning and implementing trails at Kimball Junction, Highland Drive and Rasmussen Road.

Jordan said that while the 2010 bond focused heavily on trails, this time the bond was weighted more heavily toward recreation projects. The lion's share is $5.


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5 million for the Fieldhouse, which Fieldhouse and Facilities Manager Matt Strader told The Park Record would primarily be used to construct a large indoor multi-purpose area adjacent to the existing facility.

Adding more indoor areas to Fieldhouse was identified by residents as a major request through surveys conducted by the district, Strader said. The multi-purpose area would be used for a number and variety of sports, but the hard court would accommodate sports including basketball, volleyball, pickleball, soccer practices, and lacrosse.

As it is, the Fieldhouse is "pretty much booked solid" from late August through April, from the early morning to as late as midnight for certain activities, Strader said.

If the proposal is given the go-ahead by County Council, the public will be able to give input on the bonds at a public hearing by August, when the measure has to be submitted to the County Clerk to be on the November ballot.

If approved by voters, this would be the last bond proposed for four years, Jordan said.

"I would never be egotistical to believe it's a slam dunk," Jordan said of passage of the bond. "Seventy-two percent was unbelievable. We'll never get 100 percent. It's up to the voters at the end of the day."

In 2010, the Council knocked the proposed $25 million bond down to a $20 million bond.