Beethoven Festival will open Young Artist Institute | ParkRecord.com

Beethoven Festival will open Young Artist Institute

Scholarship donations are being accepted

There will be a new educational component to the Park City Chamber Music Society's Park City Beethoven Festival this year.

The festival, a month-long classical music event that will open on July 2, will open the doors of the Beethoven Festival Young Artist Institute on July 5, said Festival Director Leslie Harlow.

"We will host two (institute) sessions," Harlow told The Park Record. "The first will run from July 5-10. The second will run July 11-16. Some students will attend both sessions."

The students will be housed at the Homestead Resort in Midway.

"Some of the faculty will be housed there as well," Harlow said.

Harlow selected the Homestead because of its affordability and space.

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"There is a lot of room for the students to rehearse," she said. "Also, the kids can eat at the restaurants for a discount and there are many places they can set up outside to play their instruments."

The curriculum will cover chamber and solo performances.

"We structure entire days for the students and faculty as far as classes and rehearsals and private practicing," Harlow said. "During that time, students will attend chamber music and solo master classes and will be coached in groups together."

There will also be a chamber orchestra that will include students and faculty.

"We'll bring some of the performances to Park City," Harlow said.

The faculty is comprised of musicians and music teachers from around the country.
They include Harlow, a violist; her husband Russell, a clarinetist; violinists Stephanie Chase, Donna Fairbanks, Simon Gollo, Blanka Bednarz and Monte Belknap; cellists Jeffrey Solow and Cheun Chau. Pianist Doris Stevenson will also participate.

The tuition for each student per session is $550 for classes and $330 for housing.

"We've also started raising money for a scholarship fund that will help students who need to be here but can't afford it," Harlow said.

Donations are being accepted through http://www.razoo.com/story/YoungArtistScholarships.
Donations can also be sent to the Park City Chamber Music Society Beethoven Festival, P.O. Box 354, Park City, Utah. 84060.

"If they send a check, they can make it out to the Park City Chamber Music Society and write in 'scholarship' in the memo line," Harlow said. "We need to raise $12,000 for scholarships for kids to attend. We don't want to turn students down."

This is the only fundraising the Park City Chamber Music Society will do for the scholarships this year.

"We do get grants and do additional fundraising for the Beethoven Festival, but the scholarships are different," Harlow said. "If we accept students into the program, we will do our best to make sure they can afford it."

Musicians can apply and audition for the Young Artist Institute by visiting
http://www.beethovenfestivalutah.org, where they will find instructions about what to play.

"The videos don't have to be professional videos," Harlow said. "They can even do one on their phone. I don't want to make it so hard that someone who wants to apply won't be intimidated by submitting a video."

Harlow will give a certain amount of preference to Utah students.

"I want to do this because they are so far from being able to go to New York and other places," she said.

While there is a level of playing the institute would like to maintain, Harlow will accommodate different levels of ability and ages.

"Since we have all of their audition videos, we can figure out what groups they belong to and what they need to work on," she said. "Even if you have someone at 15 who can play at the level of someone who is 22, we'll put them together."

Applicants must be between 14 and 27 years old on or before July 1. There is no deadline for submissions at this time.

The Beethoven Festival Young Artists Institute is modeled after a camp Harlow attended when she was a teen, living in Lubbock, Texas.

"I went to New York to study at this camp and one of the teachers was a teacher at Juilliard," Harlow said. "Meeting him and learning from him at the camp helped me gain the confidence to apply and audition for Juilliard."

Harlow auditioned and was accepted into the world-renowned music school.

The man who ran the camp was violinist Charles Castleman, founder of the Castleman Quartet Programs.

"We've remained friends all this time and I invited him to come play at the Beethoven Festival in the past," Harlow said.

In the past, the Park City Chamber Music Society ran a music institute in Park City. It ran for four to six weeks and closed in 2000.

"We decided to do a program that was shorter and more affordable, which will make it easier for students to attend," Harlow said. "We found that college tuitions and conservatory prices have shot up sky high, so a lot of music students are working to raise money so they can go to school."

In addition to helping students gain confidence and build networks, the institute, Harlow hopes, will help students further their careers.

"We call them students who are working on their crafts, but in reality, they are young professionals who are starting their careers," Harlow said. "Two students from our past camps are now playing for the Utah Symphony, and we also have a lot of other students who not only have started their own music festivals, but are also professors at music schools and have started their own ensembles."

For information about the Beethoven Festival Young Artist Institute, visit http://www.beethovenfestivalutah.org.