Filmmaker will discuss his fly-tying and fishing videos | ParkRecord.com

Filmmaker will discuss his fly-tying and fishing videos

Documentary film lovers will have a chance to experience a different kind of movie when Gilbert Rowley comes to town.

Rowley, a filmmaker who specializes in fly-fishing videos, will be the featured speaker during the High Country Fly Fishers' February meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 7, at Red Rock Brewing, 1640 W. Redstone Center Drive at Kimball Junction.

The meeting, which is free and open to the public, will focus on Rowley's work as well as his fly-tying said Dave Allison, president of High Country Fly Fishers, the Park City branch of the environmental nonprofit Trout Unlimited.

The evening will start off with some fly-tying demos and High Country Fly Fishing business before leading into Rowley's presentations.

"Gilbert Rowley has made many films, including four that became official selections into the International Fly Fishing Film Festivals from 2016-2018," Allison said. "He also made the recent instructional film called 'Modern Nymphing.'"

One of the videos is about Lance Egan, a member of the U.S. Fly Fishing Team, who champions the European nymphing style, Allison said.

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"The nymphing technique around here has been the Provo bounce rig, which uses a regular fly rod," he explained. "Fishers will attach a strike indicator, or a floater, a leader, two flies, tied off from a tippet to the line. Then you put a weight in at the bottom."

The leader, Allison said, is a special line that measures 7 to 10 feet that attaches to the fly line, and the tippet is a line that is attached to the leader, and that's where you tie on the fly.

"Euro nymphing is different because it uses no indicator or weight, so the leaders are more than 20 feet long, and you also use a longer rod that's about 12 or 13 feet," Allison said. "It also uses something called a sighter, a line which is usually bright orange, that is really a section of the leader. And that is what you keep out of the water. So when a fish comes along and takes your fly, the sighter dips into the water. It's like your indicator."

The flies for Euro nymphing are also different than standard nymphing.

"They are pretty big and tied on J hooks," Allison said. "They also look different than natural flies. For example, there is a tied fly called a red dart that doesn't look like anything in the river, but the fish try to eat them."

Rowley, who earned a bachelors degree in fisheries and aquatic science from Utah State University, has spent the last eight years as a fly-fishing guide on the Provo River.

"He is also the owner of Capture Adventure Media, a company uses videos to inspire, captivate and educate people about the outdoors," Allison said. "He is also a fly designer for the Logan-based fly-tying business Rainy's Flies."

Allison is looking forward to seeing more of Rowley's videos and films.

"I can sit and watch them all day, which I do sometimes," he said, laughing.

In addition to the fly-tying demonstrations and video presentations, the High Country Fly Fishers will do an opportunity drawing.

"Gilbert has donated a full day guide trip for two on a local river," Allison said. "He will instruct the winners on the Euro nymphing technique."

Drawing winners are responsible for waders/boots and fishing licenses.

"Gilbert will provide the rods, reels and other Euro nymphing-specific gear, unless the anglers desire otherwise," Allison said. "The trip must be taken in 2018."

High Country Fly Fishers will present filmmaker Gilbert Rowley during their February meeting at 6 p.m. For information, visit http://www.highcountryflyfishers.com.