Free drive-in screenings of ‘Dora’ and ‘Encanto’ designed to help families enjoy quality time together | ParkRecord.com
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Free drive-in screenings of ‘Dora’ and ‘Encanto’ designed to help families enjoy quality time together

Partnership designed to help fight drug abuse and underage drinking

Twilight Drive-In at the UOP: ‘Dora and the Lost City of Gold,' rated PG

  • When: 7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 11
  • Where: Utah Olympic Park
  • Cost: free, but registration suggested to get a free meal
  • Web: parkcityfilm.org

Twilight Drive-In at the UOP: ‘Encanto,’ rated PG

  • When: 9 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 11
  • Where: Utah Olympic Park
  • Cost: free, but registration suggested to get a free meal
  • Web: parkcityfilm.org
Park City Film and Summit County Health Division of Behavioral Health will present a free screenings of “Dora and the Lost City of Gold,” above, and “Encanto” on Aug. 11 during the Twilight Drive-In at Utah Olympic Park series. Families and filmgoers, who register in advance, can enjoy free sandwiches and popcorn during the screenings.
Courtesy of Park City Film

Park City Film and the Summit County Health Division of Behavioral Health would love to see local families spend more quality time together.

So, the two organizations are partnering for the second year for free screenings on Thursday, Aug. 11, during the Twilight Drive-In at Utah Olympic Park series.

The films — James Bobin’s “Dora and the Lost City of Gold” and Jared Bush, Byron Howard and Charise Castro Smith’s “Encanto” — both rated PG, are scheduled to start at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., respectively.



Although the screenings are free and open to the public, registration is encouraged. And those who register in advance can select box lunch dinners — turkey or peanut butter and jelly sandwiches — to enjoy while watching the films, said Pamella Bello, director of Behavioral Health prevention.

Studies show if a teen starts drinking at 13, they have a 46% chance of becoming addicted to alcohol…” Kathy Day, Summit County Health Division of Behavioral Health prevention coordinator

“We want to make it easy on the families and show them how they can have fun together,” she said. “Studies show that spending time with family, and families that are connected with good relationships, helps prevent kids from getting involved in drugs and alcohol in the future.”



Preventing drug abuse and underage drinking is one of the main missions of the Behavioral Health division, said Prevention Coordinator Kathy Day. 

“We want to help people in the county lead successful and healthy lives,” she said. “In order for that to take place, we want them to not abuse alcohol or drugs and have a good mental state in their minds.”

Spending fun, quality time is the first step in a three-step program that strengthens families, Day said.

“The second step is setting boundaries with clear messaging,” she said. “The clear message we always like to emphasize is ‘no under-age drinking.’”

The third step is monitoring children.

“As parents we need to make sure we know where our kids are, who they are with and what they are doing,” Day said.

Monitoring also emphasizes the importance of parents meeting their children’s friends and their friend’s parents, Bello said.

These steps are showcased in a public service campaign called “Parents in Power” that Behavioral Health has released throughout Utah, she said.

“The campaign is designed to prevent undrage drinking, and the money from the (department of alcoholic beverage service) puts the campaign together,” she said. “We will play some of these commercials when we screen the movies.” 

“Encanto,” which will be one of the Aug. 11 free screenings at Utah Olympic Park. The screenings are made possible by a partnership between Park City Film and Summit County Health Division of Behavioral Health.
Courtesy of Park City Film

In addition, Behavioral Health will hand out bags that contain program information to drive-in patrons, Bello said.

“The bags will also include goodies like popcorn containers and popcorn for movie night at home with parents and children,” she said.

Not being an influence is one of the biggest misconceptions parents have regarding their children, especially teens, Day said.

“When parents are asked who they think has the greatest influence on their kids, they always say peers or the media, but research shows that teens say that their parents are their biggest influences,” she said. “That’s something we try to emphasize. We want parents to realize they have a great influence on their kids, especially when it comes to drinking alcohol.”

Preventing underage drinking can save families heartbreak in the future, Day said.

“Studies show if a teen starts drinking at 13, they have a 46% chance of becoming addicted to alcohol,” she said. “If they wait until they are 21, the percentage goes down to 7%, which is a significant drop.”

Bello came up with the idea for Behavioral Health to partner with Park City Film two years ago.

“They started doing these drive-in movies at the beginning of COVID, and I went with my family, looking for something to do that was safe, outside and fun,” she said. “I loved the idea of watching the movie under the sky, and thought we could partner with Park City Film and pay for everything to get people there to see how wonderful it is. We partnered last year for the first time.”

Katharine Wang, Park City Film executive director, said last year’s screenings of Robert Rodriguez’s “Spy Kids” and Enrique Gato’s “Capture the Flag” screenings were successful.

“It really supports the initiative to create events to bring families together,” she said. “And providing dinners encourages families to spend time and eat dinner together.”

“Dora and the Lost City of Gold” will be screened in English with Spanish subtitles, and “Encanto” will be screened in Spanish with English subtitles to reach the Latinx community, Bello said.

“I’m from South America, and it’s important for me to reach everybody in the community,” she said. “I’ve been doing this job for 14 years, and from day one it has been important to do everything in Spanish and English, because the Latinx community is the second biggest population in Summit County. So it’s very important we reach them.”

Bello also noted that many Summit County schools have Spanish dual immersion programs.

“Parents may want to have their children in these programs take advantage of this opportunity to help them with their studies,” she said.


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