Hoffmans Fine Art returns to Main Street | ParkRecord.com

Hoffmans Fine Art returns to Main Street

Ioni Hoffman, standing, and Don Hoffman, own Hoffmans Fine Art. The gallery has moved back to Main Street after 20 years. Some of the artists it represents include sculptor Stanley Wanlass, and painters Cynthie Fisher, Ezra Tucker and Larry Reilly. (Tanzi Propst/Park Record)

After 20 years, Hoffman Fine Art is back on Main Street.

The gallery, owned by Don Hoffman and Ioni Hoffman, set up shop at 605 Main St., the former space occupied by Farasha Boutique, a couple of weeks ago.

For Don, the move back is a welcome one.

"We feel like gypsies because we have moved around so much," he said. "But we'll see how this goes."

Back in the 1980s, Hoffmans Fine Art, then known as the Lido Gallery, was located at 268 Main St., in what was the Mrs. Fields Cookie College building.

"The floors weren't level at that space," Hoffman said, laughing. "They were so sloped that if I sat in my office chair, I would literally slide out of it. So, I had to turn my chair around and face a wall so I could just sit there."

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From that location, Hoffman moved Lido Gallery to the top of Main for a couple of years and down to lower Main. Hoffman also ran Lido galleries in Carmel, California, and Sedona and Scottsdale in Arizona.

"We had five galleries, including one on Main Street in Park City, at one time" he said.

This was when he begin experimenting with a system called The Registry, a closed-circuit networking platform that tapped into the pool of galleries.

The equipment, which was furnished by Sony and Pioneer, gave his clients an idea of the art Hoffman Exotics and some other galleries had to offer.

"We had initially developed this system 30 years or so before the Internet," Hoffman said.

Hoffman retired the Lido Gallery name and opened Hoffman Exotics and Fine Art at Redstone 2009, and them moved the gallery to Quinn's Junction two years ago.

With every move, he took The Registry with him.

"We have more than 5,000 pieces in The Registry, and that doesn't include the exotic automobiles, motorcycles and aircrafts," he said. "While all of our inventory is in storage, we can show people all of what we have on the screen, and then find what our clients are interested in. We have tons of art and I think we can target what our clients want."

In addition to the works documented in The Registry, Hoffman has adorned the new Main Street space with a smattering of works from artists he feels have a universal draw.

Those artists include sculptor Stanley Wanlass and painters Cynthie Fisher, Ezra Tucker and Larry Reilly.

"I wanted to show some of the artists I thought are very popular," Hoffman said. "I think we did the right thing because already people have been coming in to see what we have."

Ioni said she and Hoffman stumbled into the new Main Street space.

"We were always looking for a place back on Main Street," she said. "One day Don was driving around and saw the for sale sign."

The two contacted the building's owner and asked if they could work out a deal, and moved in three weeks ago.

"We did some painting and are in the process of installing some pedestals for the sculptures," Ioni said.

Still, moving from a 5,000 square-foot space to a 410 square-foot space is an adjustment for Hoffman.

"The area is smaller than what we're used to, so that's why it's important we have The Registry," he said. "I think people will enjoy coming in and start looking at what we have."

Hoffmans Fine Art is now located at 605 Main St. For information, visit http://www.hoffmansfineart.com.