J GO Gallery celebrates Massively Small art | ParkRecord.com

J GO Gallery celebrates Massively Small art

Five years ago, J GO Gallery debuted the Massively Small Show.

The goal was to give artists an opportunity to create more accessible works. In addition to the artists that are represented by the gallery, other artists were invited to participate as well.

"Seeing works in a small format helps the viewer see everything at once and draws them in to see the detail," said J GO Gallery co-owner Jude Grenney. "At first, we didn’t specify how small, so we received a very random of things. It has been neat to see how we can install these works and how they group together. This gives our clients an idea of how to display smaller works."

The J GO Gallery’s fifth annual Massively Small Show will open during the Park City Gallery Association’s monthly gallery stroll on Friday, July 31. The hours will be from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. and admission is free.

Since 2013, all the works in the show are required to measure 12 inches by 12 inches.

"Fortunately, most artists are game to try this," Grenney said.

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This year, a total of 28 artists plan to participate in the exhibit. (See list below.)

"Fourteen are J GO Gallery artists and we invited an additional 13," Grenney said. "This keeps the event fun and fresh and we can show a more diverse and eclectic mix of work that we usually do.

"It’s great for artists to create these smaller works so they can work out the details of making bigger works," she said. "They can figure out how they can create these types of works on a larger scale."

While Grenney enjoys preparing for the show, it does take a lot of work.

"That’s what I love about my job," she said. "There is a lot of communication with new artists and I get to look at new art and select which artists to show."

The Massively Small Show has evolved over time, according to Grenney.

"This year, some artists that have been involved with the show have recommended new artists whom they thought would work well with the gallery, and we are able to represent them on a more ongoing basis, which is part of the reason why we do this show every year," she said. "We like to see how our clients like new artists, who we are considering to do some continual representation."

One of the J GO artists to do so is San Francisco-based painter Elaine Coombs, who recommended Colorado-based artist Heather Patterson to Grenney.

"They are collaborating on a series of work called ‘Second State,’" Grenney said. "Heather starts a piece with a line drawing and sends it to Elaine, who paints in the bulk of her trees and textures. Then Heather draws and even spray paints more designs and sends it back to Elaine, who puts the final touches on it. The combination of the two is a very interesting point for [art lovers] to consider, because this method mixes both traditional and contemporary styles."

Another contemporary artist whose works are in the show is Chris Maynard.

"He creates images about birds out of the feathers of birds," Grenney explained. "He’s done some great works that we show in our Wonderbox section. We’ve never had him in the main J GO Gallery part, although his work straddles that curiosity and fine-art element."

Returning to the show is J GO Gallery’s co-owner Curtis Olson.

"The works will show where he is right now," Grenney said. "He’s always loved circles that represents all kinds of things including sunsets, Buddhism, mandalas and medicine wheels.

"In architecture, circles are such a pure form not seen often, so he has put them in his works," she said. "He’s moved on from straight lines with little circles to these more elaborate circles."

Another returning artist is Jessica Hess, who does realistic still life that usually depicts blighted urban scenes.

"We love her work because they are such strong pieces," Grenney said. "We haven’t chosen to represent her on an ongoing basis, but her art in this scale for this event is one of our strongest offerings."

An artist that J GO Gallery is seriously considering is Daniel Angeles.

"He’s a watercolor artist whose works are related to a common saying," Grenney said. "For example, he has a bird toting a candle that is burning at both ends and has a bird marking off the days on an eggshell."

A long-standing J GO artist is Jay Kelly.

"I’ve worked with Jay since the Phoenix Gallery and a few years ago he started doing torn-paper prints," Grenney said. "His works are comprised of thousands of shreds of prints from vintage magazines and the final image is inspired by the types of articles he used. We carry his work all the time, but never any of this scale. He has a hard time keeping up with the demand, and doesn’t have to create these small works, but he has been one of our artists for such a long time, he’s been good at participating in this show."

Massively Small Show participants

J GO artists:

Curtis Olson

Paul Vincent Bernard

Jaye Schlesinger

Kelly Schurger

Carole Wade

Jenn Shifflet

Elaine Coombs

Denise Duong

Jay Kelly

Michael Dickter

Chris Maynard

Sherri Belassen

Mikel Covey

Greg Ragland

Invitees

Heather Patterson

Jessica Hess

Ezra Siegel

Amy Genser

Daniel Angeles

John Bell

Michael Aaron

Sarina Villareal

Jane Gutheridge

Rose Umerlik

Krista Reuter

John Westmark

Tiffany Bozic

J GO Gallery, 408 Main St., will open its fifth annual Massively Small Show with an artist reception on Friday, July 31, from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://www.jgogallery.com.