Park City gives a bleep for nonprofits | ParkRecord.com

Park City gives a bleep for nonprofits

The sixth annual “Giving a Bleep: The Show,” presented by Giving a Bleep, raised nearly $10,000 for nonprofit organizations.

Local residents showed how much they cared when attending "Giving a Bleep: The Show."

The community musical farce that ran Oct. 27-28 and Nov. 3-4, at the Prospector Conference Center Theater, raised nearly $10,000 for nonprofit organizations through ticket sales.

The catch was the theater-goers named their own ticket prices, said Annette Velarde, the executive of Giving a Bleep, the nonprofit that presents "Giving a Bleep: The Show."

"We had a large number of ticket holders who paid $5 or less for tickets, and that was wonderful, because all of the money from the tickets go to the designated nonprofits," Velarde told The Park Record. "That told me the word has gotten out to our local residents whose budgets can't regularly allow them to get out and enjoy live concerts and other performances, were able to some see and enjoy our show."

That, in turn, not only showed Velarde that the residents not only wanted to be entertained, but also wanted to donate to good causes.

"I'm moved to know that they donated $2, just as much as I'm moved that someone who donated $100 per ticket," she said. "They were able give as much as they can."

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"Much of money went to Peace House and Mountain Trails, but audiences dog-eared other, larger nonprofits such as the American Red Cross and the American Cancer Society, too," she said.

The donations were not the only thing that gave Velarde warm fuzzies.

"I can't believe we're already in our sixth year," she said. "And those who helped us in the early years celebrated with us."

One person who contributed was local developer Mark J. Fischer, who donated the stage space at The Yard for the "Giving a Bleep: The Show" world premiere in 2012.

"That was the only way we could have pulled the first year off, and he did it to a completely? unknown organization that basically showed all signs of never getting off the ground," Velarde said with a laugh. "Mark had not come to see a show since that first year, but he came this year and it was particularly heartwarming."

Another early helper was Casey Metzger, owner of Top Shelf, who provides the show's cash bar.

"He bet on us the first year, and didn't make me sign a contract," Velarde said. "He had no reason to do that, except for the kindness of his heart."

Velarde was glad to see Metzger in the audience this year.

"He didn't need to come," she said. "He's a busy guy that owns a big business, but he was there."

Velarde also thanked the Prospector, which has been Giving a Bleep's home for the past five years.

"The first time we did [the performance] there, they really didn't know what to expect," she laughed. "Now, they have embraced us. They are excited when we start rehearsals and sad when we perform our closing night."

Of course, "Giving a Bleep: The Show" couldn't have gone on without the volunteer cast members and crew.

"They give what they can out of the goodness of their hearts," Velarde said. "I think we had only one rehearsal when everyone attended, and our new players always wonder how we pull it off. Yet, we witness a miracle every opening night. No one gets paid for what they do. We're not building anything, except community."

For information about Giving a Bleep, a nonprofit, visit http://www.givingableep.com.