Project ABC broke city and county barriers | ParkRecord.com

Project ABC broke city and county barriers

The Summit County Fair is an example of how arts and culture enhances life in Summit County.

Summit County artists and arts educators aren't the only ones excited by Project ABC.

Both the Park City and Summit County councils are looking forward to using the initiative as a road map in future developments.

Park City will look to the initiative as it works on the proposed arts district at Bonanza Park, said City Council member Nann Worel.

"It's all a blank canvas in terms of how it will shape up and look," Worel said. "So the recommendations that were given to Project ABC will be considered as we move forward."

Summit County Council Vice Chair Roger Armstrong said the county will implement Project ABC project-by-project.

"We are also finding new art opportunities," he said. "Kimball Junction is in the process of some new planning so people can get around there better and feel like a true community center. I think public art will fit into that."

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Armstrong has also talked with developers about the possibility of incorporating public art into future developments.

"I think they see the value in that," he said. "We see sculptures all around Park City where developers have taken risks and included these pieces of art in their developments, and we at the county hope to find new ways to help incentivize more art through the development code in some way."

Worel enjoyed her role as liaison from the council to the initiative.

"I had the opportunity to watch it bloom, take shape and watch all the different stakeholders come together," Worel said. "We wanted to see something comprehensive rather than seeing just Park City do it's own thing or the (Snyderville) Basin and Coalville doing their own things."

She also liked that Project ABC was designed to break down the barriers between the city and county, saying much of the activity in the area was confined to their respective "silos."

"Project ABC, if it accomplished nothing else, knocked those silos down. It connected people countywide in a way that had never been done before," she said.

Armstrong, who was on the advisory committee that underlined the effort of Project ABC, agreed.

"I think there's a place for the entire arts and culture community to come together as one voice and do this in something other than isolated ways," he said.

Armston said much of that result was due to the hard work of Park City Summit County Arts Council Executive Director Hadley Dynak and Project Manager Consultant Jake McIntire, who he introduced to leaders in Kamas, Oakley and other communities in the county.

Dynak and McIntire were able to get participation from the municipalities and school districts, according to Armstrong.

"Project ABC is truly a county-wide effort and it's rare, because we tend to divide ourselves into 'East' and 'West' groups," he said. "This initiative crosses those artificial borders cleanly and offers us an opportunity to learn from each other about our respective cultures, and gain understanding and develop tolerance. I think that's the beauty of arts and culture."

Worel said she is grateful for her role as the city council liaison to Project ABC.

"The arts one of the things that drew my husband Mike and I to Park City," she said. "The vibrancy of the arts here and ease of access was appealing to us, and it's been rewarding and exciting to look at the creativity, potential and the minds that came together to dream big with the initiative."