Project ABC community convening will focus on public art places and programming | ParkRecord.com

Project ABC community convening will focus on public art places and programming

Katherine Nix, Salt Lake City Arts Council public art program manager, will be one of three guest speakers at the upcoming Project ABC community convening that will be held Friday morning at CreatePC on Main Street.
Courtesy of Jake McIntire

What: Project ABC community convening

When: 9:30 a.m. to noon on Friday, Nov. 15

Where: CreatePC, 660 Main St.

Cost: Free

RSVP: eventbrite.com/e/project-abc-community-convening-public-art-community-building-tickets-79379096013

Web: projectabcsc.com

This Friday, a free public meeting will give local residents a chance to learn more about the places and programming priorities of the Park City Summit County Arts Council’s Project ABC, a cultural planning initiative.

The event will include a light breakfast and coffee, and is set to be held from 9:30 a.m. to noon on Friday, Nov. 15, at CreatePC, 660 Main St.

Places and programming are at the heart of how public art creates vibrant places in the community, and how those places connect with the community, said Jake McIntire, lead consultant for Project ABC.

“It’s about how public art connects with other community priorities — transportation, public health or social equity and diversity,” he said.

It’s about how public art connects with other community priorities — transportation, public health or social equity and diversity…” Jake McIntire, Project ABC lead consultant

The program will include presentations by Katherine Nix, Salt Lake City Arts Council public art program manager; Nancy Boskoff, arts management consultant and Megan Hallett, artist, visual arts specialist at Escalante Elementary, and the director of Framework Arts, an art education nonprofit.

Nix, who has helped facilitate public art installations including Ned Kahn’s “Pages of Salt,” a $2.2 million teflon-panel project that was installed on the east side of the Waker Center parking garage in Salt Lake City, will talk about that project, and the importance of the geographic distribution of public art, McIntire said.

“Geographic distribution is important because we want the broadest possible percentage of the community to benefit from the art,” he said. “This is something we talk about in Summit County. We want to make sure the public art isn’t just concentrated in Park City.”

Boskoff, former director of the Salt Lake City Arts Council, will expand on Nix’s presentation and relay her personal experiences, McIntire said.

Hallett’s presentation will showcase some of her projects that intersect the arts with community-building.

“After the speakers give their takes on the topic, and attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions,” he said. “We’ll also engage in a discussion about what these ideas mean to us and how they relate to the development of Summit County.”

These community convenings are designed to help the public learn about Project ABC, which stands for arts, beauty and culture, in digestible bits, McIntire said.

“We find different people from throughout the state who are experts on these topics and programming, and ask them to come in and share their perspectives,” McIntire said. “We also make sure it ties back to how these viewpoints and experiences tie back to Summit County.”

One example of places and programmings is the CreatePC space, which opened in September.

The venue, formerly Zoom restaurant, is now a studio where artists and creatives can make and showcase their work, McIntire said.

“I was able to visit CreatePC a few weeks ago, and we are very pleased that we’re going to have an event there,” he said.


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