Second Project ABC convening will feature guest speakers | ParkRecord.com

Second Project ABC convening will feature guest speakers

Jennifer Ortiz, museum services manager for the Utah Division of Arts and Museums, will give a presentation at the next Project ABC community convening on Friday at the Summit County Library Kamas Valley Branch..
Courtesy of the Park City Summit County Arts Council

Project ABC community convening: rural arts development and arts resources 9 a.m. to noon, Friday, Feb. 22 Summit County Library Kamas Valley Branch, 110 N. Main St. Free, but registration is suggested facebook.com/ParkCitySummitCountyArtsCouncil/

Project ABC, the Park City Summit County Arts Council’s cultural planning initiative, is taking another big step.

From 9 a.m. to noon on Friday Feb. 22, at the Summit County Library Kamas Valley Branch, 110 N. Main St., Project ABC (Arts, Beauty, Culture) will invite discussion on fostering art in rural areas in its second convening since it began holding forums in November.

Although the convening is free and open to the public, registration at the council’s Facebook page is suggested.

The event will feature presentations by guests from outside the Summit County community who will share their insights on the subject, according to Jake McIntire, program director of Project ABC.

I think many people worry that art is about doing something new, but that’s not the case…” Jake McIntire, Project ABC program director

Jason Bowcutt, Community Arts Manager at Utah Division of Arts and Museums, Jennifer Ortiz, museum services manager for the Utah Division of Arts and Museums and Maria Sykes, executive director of Epicenter in Green River are set to speak at the event.

The Utah Division of Arts and Museums is the state agency in charge of arts programs and museums, and Epicenter is a nonprofit aimed at encouraging economic and arts development in the small town north of Moab.

“Our guests will speak for the first hour and half of the event,” he said. “There will be questions and answers between each presenter, and then we’ll have a bigger chunk of Q and As after the final presentation.”

After a break, attendees will regather and talk about the presentations.

“We’ll discuss how the things that were presented can relate to Summit County, and how we can implement those findings into Project ABC,” McIntire said. “At the tail of end that three hours, we’ll have time to mingle and share ideas in a less formal way.”

Jocelyn Scudder, managing director of Park City Summit County Arts Council, said the convenings are opportunities to further dialogue on how arts and culture can support communities countywide.

“Rural arts development is a part of that,” she said. “Arts and culture are top priorities in Park City, and we know they are important countywide.”

McIntire looks forward to hearing the speakers’ viewpoint of rural arts development, and how they can apply to Project ABC’s data gathered through surveys and open houses in the past two-and-a-half years.

“We found people are interested in this idea of letting arts and culture be a way to celebrate the existing creative aspects of a community, rather than bringing in something new,” he said of the speakers. “I think many people worry that art is about doing something new, but that’s not the case. I think all of our speakers can agree on that.”

Some of the examples of how arts, culture and design currently fuel existing community priorities in Summit County include housing and economic development and education to increase town vibrancy, according to Scudder.

“The challenge, however, is balancing and celebrating the differences between Park City and the other towns in the county,” she said. “Park City will have different priorities than Francis or Oakley and Coalville. And those towns have different priorities and identities.”

McIntire agreed.

“We don’t want to copy and paste what other communities are doing,” he said. “Rather, we want to look at what they are doing and build upon those things in Summit County.”

Scudder said the event is also intended to raise awareness of the resources available to local artists.

“It’s our role to make sure the community is aware of arts opportunities that are available on the state level,” she said. “There are multiple grants for individuals and organizations; museum collections management supports, and vibrant public art program. We are acting as a conduit to make sure our community knows what they have to offer.”