The Motet put its trust in Lyle Divinsky | ParkRecord.com

The Motet put its trust in Lyle Divinsky

New singer enjoying life in the band

The Motet has brought its jazz and Afrobeat-inspired funk to audiences all over the world for nearly 20 years, meaning the Denver-based band has seen an array of artists pass through its revolving door, leaving some influences and styles behind.

"I think that's what makes the band unique and what inspires me," vocalist Lyle Divinsky said during a Park Record telephone call from Los Angeles, California. "It take parts of band from before and brings in the new influences."

Divinsky, the group's newest singer, feels his vocals have also influenced the band and is excited to show off his souful singing when The Motet plays at O.P. Rockwell on Saturday.

"I think the band was more on the funk side of things before I joined," he said. "I feel like I bring more of a soul mark into the band."

Divinsky joined the band last year while it was working on the album "Totem." He said it's been a great experience so far.

"The guys had already recorded all the instrumentals the previous year and they had some sketches of songs with the former make-up of the group," he said. "As they interviewed me to get a feel for what I do, they sent me a couple of the instrumental recordings to see how my writing would go."

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The first was a track the band nearly scrapped.

"They were having a bit of a hard time with it," Divinsky said. "I wrote the song in a couple of days and sent it back to them."

The track became a song called "The Truth," which is the opening song on "Totem."

"After that, they sent me a second song," Divinsky said.

In a similar situation, he wrote the lyrics and sent it back. The song titled "Fool No More" became the second song on the record.

A few days later, Divinsky attended a couple of rehearsals and did some live shows.

"They asked me to join the band," he said. "It was a crazy thing because I ended up writing the lyrics to the rest of the songs and went into the studio the following month. So, within less than three months, I was in the band and in the studio."

Divisnky said the trust the band had in him meant a lot.

"It's a real testament of those guys because they put a lot of confidence in my creativity," he said.

It also helped that Divinsky knew the album's producer Eric Krasno.

"We go back a long time, so it was great working with him," Divinsky said. "It's been a fun journey jumping into this."

Still, Divinsky was already turning heads prior to joining the Motet.

He was hailed by Fuse TV's as an "Artist to Watch" and was awarded the Songwriter's Hall of Fame Abe Olman Scholarship, the same scholarship John Legend received in 2002.

The earliest influence was his father who was into soul and funk..

"[He] is an amazing singer and musician," Divinsky said. "If I can keep up with him and get to his level, I think I'll be alright."

Divinsky said the lack of boundaries is what he loves most about the Motet.

"We don't try to keep up with certain genres or trends because it's about taking whatever we're inspired by at the moment and put that into what we do," he said.

The band's philosophy also bleeds into its live performances.

"Every audience has a different energy and vibe that they give off, which in turn influences us and our playing," Divinsky said. "Every night becomes different and that's the beauty of it."

That's also the biggest reward of being in the band so far.

"No matter how tired we may be from traveling or worn out we might be from lack of sleep, the moment you get on stage and the moment our drummer (Dave Watts) counts off the first song it all disappears," Divinsky said. "We're also especially lucky to have such an incredible fan base. If we are a little tired, the energy comes from them immediately, so we don't have to battle to keep ourselves up and on."

The Motet will play at 10 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 18, at O.P. Rockwell, 268 Main St. For information, visit http://www.oprockwell.com.