A portrait of Park City’s essential workers | ParkRecord.com

A portrait of Park City’s essential workers

The majority of Summit County residents have been confined to their homes for the better part of a month, apart from trips for necessities like food or seeking fresh air in the outdoors, as part of the effort to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Tyler Kelsch, an operator with Republic Services: “The only real change is just the social distancing.”
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Still others wake up each day, get dressed and carry on in roles that have been deemed vital, even as life has ground to a halt for most people. Their duties range from protecting neighborhoods to replenishing grocery store shelves to providing health care to delivering mail — and the list goes on. 

Main Street Postal Clerks Jessie White, left, and James Crawford: “It’s become more time consuming…the lines have dwindled, but people keep trickling in,” White says.
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They are doing their part, while in many cases risking their own safety, to keep the community functioning during a crisis with no modern equivalent.

State Liquor Store #38 employee Stacey Williams restocks wine prior to business hours.
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They are Summit County’s essential workers.

Oscar Salinas, a transit dispatcher, helps keep the buses of Park City moving, snow or shine.
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Summit County’s essential workers have adapted to health department guidelines as they continue their vital duties throughout the community. From wearing face masks and gloves to keeping socially distant, the measures allow the workers to help keep Park City and the county functioning.



Dustin Lewis, left, and Tony Piscitelli, Grade 4 operators with the Snyderville Basin Water Reclamation District, service sewer lines using high-pressure cleaning tools.
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Healthcare workers continue to meet with patients via tele-medicine calls on Zoom. Postal workers ensure letters to loved ones and packages of toilet paper are delivered on time. Transit operators help move community members throughout town on their quests to pick up food and other necessities at the grocery store.

Alex Meza, an employee at The Market at Park City, restocks bananas in the produce section during his shift.
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“Despite the challenges we are currently facing, we are extremely grateful for the support of the community. We have seen an outpouring of support in many ways such as kind words and actions. We feel very fortunate to continue to work while so many others have lost their jobs or opportunities. Thank you and stay safe.,” Park City Fire Captain McKay Wadley says.

Park City Fire EMT Rob Takeno, from left, AEMT Crispin Calvert, Captain McKay Wadley and Engineer Henry Evans continue to serve those in need throughout Summit County, adapting to CDC health guidelines on the job while ensuring that the patient gets the life-saving care that they need.
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“As firefighters, we train constantly in order to mitigate dynamic situations, despite the challenges we face, there are many ways for us to prepare for the unknown. However, it is very difficult to be totally prepared for the challenges and scope of the COVID pandemic,” Park City Fire Captain McKay Wadley says.

Family practice providers Rachelle Flinn, P.A., left, and Jon Hanrahan, M.D. continue to see a majority of their patients, albeit virtually, via tele-medicine calls on Zoom video conferencing.
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“Everything is different now, we have a new normal. From day to day life in the fire station, to the way we interact with the public, and how we respond on all 911 calls,” Park City Fire Captain McKay Wadley says. “…we worry about exposure to the virus. We all want to give a friendly smile or let kids check out the fire engine in the grocery store parking lot, but public safety is our top priority and that means social distance and wearing a mask for now.”

Summit County Sheriff’s Deputy Skyler Talbot: “Now more than ever, positive interactions with the community are very important. Finding new and creative ways to make those positive connections in this current climate can be challenging but also very rewarding.”
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Neftaly Madriz, an employee at The Market Park City, restocks shelves in aisle nine.
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Rob Takeno, emergency medical technician, left, and Crispin Calvert, advanced emergency medical technician, adapt to CDC health guidelines on the job while ensuring that the patient gets the life-saving care that they need.
Tanzi Propst/Park Record
Park City Police Officer Ben Powers is doing his part to keep Park City safe.
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Emily Burney, owner and operator of Auntie Em’s Baked Goods, wipes down a wooden stool in the parking lot of the Kimball Arts Center as a customer awaits pickup of a freshly baked pie and cookies.
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