Basin housing hearing is next week | ParkRecord.com
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Basin housing hearing is next week

Patrick Parkinson, Of the Record staff

Officials in Summit County will not debate the controversial affordable housing "overlays" next week.

"That doesn’t mean we’re abandoning [overlay zones] by any stretch of the imagination," Summit County Community Development Director Nora Shepard told the County Commission Wednesday. "The intent is not to put high-density affordable housing in existing single-family neighborhoods."

In proposed overlay zones incentives like density bonuses could be provided to builders willing to add affordable units to their developments.

"Our major concern about the proposed overlay is that it is designed to correct the fact that Summit County has failed to require developers to provide affordable housing when seeking approval for their projects," a letter to the county from the Sagebrook Homeowners Association states.

Basin resident Liz Davis claimed she understands the need for more affordable housing.

"My concern is the implied densities for the [overlay zones] not the affordable housing," she stated in a letter to Summit County.

Planners say more than 600 deed-restricted units are needed in Summit County to fill future housing demands for workers. They aim to create a situation where 36 percent of the workforce can afford to live in Summit County.

At a public hearing at the Sheldon Richins Building Nov. 13, the Snyderville Basin Planning Commission is slated to debate whether affordable units should become part of all new development in the Basin.

"There seems to be consensus on that," Shepard said.

Other new housing laws could be discussed at an open house in Snyderville in December, she said. "Everybody would be invited It could be discussed how our affordable housing shortage affects them," she said.

"We’re certainly not abandoning efforts, we’re just going to step back and broaden the discussion," Shepard said.


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