Brickey probed by the state |

Brickey probed by the state

Patrick Parkinson, Of the Record staff

The Utah Attorney General’s Office stopped short Tuesday of calling a probe into allegations that Summit County Attorney David Brickey lives outside the spirit of the law an investigation.

"We have received a complaint and we are reviewing it right now," said Paul Murphy, a spokesman for the Utah Attorney General’s Office. "At this point I would not call it an investigation."

In a letter former Summit County resident Jason Taylor wrote to Murphy, Taylor states, "I want to challenge right now the residency of [Brickey]."

Though the law requires Brickey intend to become a county resident in order to serve as an elected official, Brickey recently admitted that he spends lots of time with his wife and kids at a house he owns in Sugar House.

Brickey claims that home in Salt Lake as his primary residence to receive a reduction in his property taxes, according to the Salt Lake County Assessor’s Office.

But he is registered to vote in Summit County.

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Brickey insists he more than complies with the law by leasing a condominium in Old Town Park City from Greg Skordas, a criminal defense attorney in Salt Lake City.

A former Snyderville Basin resident, Brickey says he sold his home near Jeremy Ranch before he was appointed Summit County attorney in 2005. The Summit County Commission, made up of all Democrats, named Brickey, a Republican, to replace Summit County Attorney Bob Adkins, a Coalville Democrat who became a Third District Court judge.

Brickey is running unopposed Nov. 7 to keep his $105,000 per year job.

But right now he’s too strapped financially to buy property in western Summit County, Brickey lamented recently to The Park Record.

According to Summit County Commissioner Sally Elliott, Brickey has likely complied with the "letter of the law."

Brickey informed the commission when he applied for the attorney’s post that he did not live in Summit County, she said.

"He was upfront right from the beginning," Elliott said.

Meanwhile, some insist complaints about Brickey’s residency are politically motivated.

"I do not believe [Brickey] has ever physically lived in Summit County, regardless of what his lease says," states Taylor’s complaint to the attorney general.

Brickey has discounted an allegation of extortion made to the county by Hoytsville resident Brody Taylor, an independent who is running to replace Republican Summit County Sheriff Dave Edmunds, Taylor alleges.

Woodland resident John Moon broke the law when he recently told Brody Taylor to withdraw from the race or he would publicly accuse Taylor of raping his daughter eight years ago, claimed Jason Taylor, the candidate’s brother and campaign manager.

Moon has not returned several telephone calls seeking comment about the case.

"I think [Moon] should have been arrested once he admitted to the extortion allegation to the County Attorney’s Office," Taylor’s complaint to the attorney general states.

While Brody Taylor denies he raped Moon’s daughter during the couple’s relationship nearly a decade ago, the county is investigating both Moon’s and Taylor’s accusations, a County Attorney’s Office investigator said.

But Moon admitted he attempted to blackmail Brody Taylor in a conversation recorded on tape, Jason Taylor claimed, adding that the candidate has sued Moon for at least $250,000 partly for defamation.